Former Tennessee police chief convicted of excessive force, federal civil rights abuses
BruceEmmerling / Pixabay
Former Tennessee police chief convicted of excessive force, federal civil rights abuses

A Tennessee police officer was convicted Saturday of use of excessive force in violation of an arrestee’s civil rights on multiple occasions. Former Tracy City police chief Anthony “Tony” Bean’s sentencing will take place in June, and the former officer could face up to 10 years for each of the three charges.

The Civil Rights division of the US Department of Justice (DOJ) indicted Tony Bean and his son and co-defendant TJ Bean in 2019. The case stems from accusations of excessive force against two arrestees, referred to as CG and FM. During the trial last June, evidence revealed that Tony Bean punched CG in the face while he was handcuffed during an arrest in 2014. During another incident in 2017, Bean also punched FM in the face after he had been arrested and put into the police car, according to court documents. Bean failed to report these incidents internally, and is said to have later bragged about this use of force.

Prosecutors also introduced evidence that the two encouraged other officers to turn off their body cameras and advised them not to report their uses of force.

Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke with the DOJ said, “Every person in our nation has the right to be free from unlawful abuse by police officers, including the use of excessive force during an arrest. She claimed that the verdict “makes clear that law enforcement officials who use unlawful force are not above the law. We will not stand idly by in the face of criminal misconduct by law enforcement officials in any part of the country.”