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France refuses to ratify Hong Kong extradition treaty in response to Chinese national security law
© WIkimedia (Iris Tong)
France refuses to ratify Hong Kong extradition treaty in response to Chinese national security law

France refused Monday to ratify a 2017 extradition treaty with Hong Kong following China’s enactment of a controversial new national security law in the region, which French officials claim “calls into question the ‘one country, two systems’ principle.”

French officials announced that “in light of the most recent developments, as things stand, France will not ratify the extradition agreement signed on May 4, 2017, between France and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.”

Frace’s concerns have been echoed by the EU, which recently claimed that “the national security law in Hong Kong is a change that compromises the inherited framework of the 1997 handover,” and aligns with the recent suspensions of extradition by the US, EU, and the UK for what UK Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab called a “clear and serious violation.” The EU also recently imposed sanctions on China in reaction to the new legislation alleging that China’s actions are “not in conformity with China’s international commitments under the Sino-British Joint Declaration of 1984 or with the Hong Kong Basic Law.” The sanctions not only limit EU exports of certain equipment and technologies that may be used for the “repression” and “cyber-surveillance” of Hong Kong citizens.

Various countries have recently suspended extradition treaties with Hong Kong, including Germany, Australia and the United Kingdom. China has retaliated against all of those countries by suspending the treaties on its own behalf.