Europe rights court rejects Ireland appeal to reopen ‘hooded men’ torture case

Europe rights court rejects Ireland appeal to reopen ‘hooded men’ torture case

The Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) [official website] on Tuesday refused to retry [press release] a 1978 case regarding the torture of Irish “hooded men.”

In 1971 14 men affiliated with the IRA were arrested and allegedly subject to inhumane interrogation methods inside the Ulster Constabulary. In 1976 the Irish government took the men’s cause to the ECHR, which ruled [judgement] in favor of the UK.

In June 2014 the men and their solicitor petitioned the Irish government to reconsider the case, and Ireland made a second appeal to the ECHR, which was rejected on Tuesday. In its ruling the court stated that while the treatment of the men was “inhumane,” it did not constitute “torture.”

The men allege that while in British custody in 1971 they were subject to the infamous “five techniques” including wall-standing, hooding, subjection to noise, deprivation of sleep, and deprivation of food and drink.

The men expressed disappointment with the decision [BBC report]. The group has indicated that they will continue their campaign to file an appeal with the ECHR.