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US Legal News Round Up for Saturday, 28 April 2018
US Legal News Round Up for Saturday, 28 April 2018

Here’s the domestic legal news we covered this week:

The US House Intelligence Committee [official website] released its final report [report, PDF] absolving the Trump campaign from involvement in Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election.

In the almost 250-page report, Republicans concluded that the year-long investigation has produced no evidence that the Trump campaign aided in Moscow’s efforts.

Louisiana senators voted 31-1 Tuesday to approve a bill [SB181 materials] that would ban abortions at 15 weeks.

Mississippi approved [JURIST report] a similar 15-week abortion ban in March, drawing an immediate legal challenge.

An amendment to the Louisiana bill on the Senate floor means that the Louisiana bill would not go into law unless and until the Mississippi law is upheld by the courts.

The Louisiana bill must still face approval in the House.

The US Supreme Court [official website] heard oral arguments [day call, PDF] Wednesday in Trump v.
The US District Court for the District of Columbia [official website] on Tuesday vacated [ruling, PDF] the Trump administration’s efforts to terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) [official materials] program, which protects undocumented immigrants who were brought to the US as children from deportation and provides them with renewable work permits.

Judge John D.

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website] heard oral arguments in two matters Tuesday: Abbott v.
The US Supreme Court [official website] ruled [opinion, PDF] 7-2 Tuesday in Oil States Energy Services, LLC v.
The US Supreme Court [official website] ruled [opinion, PDF] 5-4 Tuesday in Jesner v.
The US Supreme Court [official website] heard oral arguments [day call, PDF] in three cases Monday.

In Lucia v.

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website] granted certiorari [order list, PDF] Monday in two cases dealing with the question of whether breaking into a mobile home or other “nonpermanent or mobile structure” constitutes a burglary under the Armed Career Criminal Act (ACCA) [text], consolidating them for oral argument.