California Supreme Court makes it easier for tax propositions to appear on ballots

California Supreme Court makes it easier for tax propositions to appear on ballots

[JURIST] The California Supreme Court [official website] issued a 5-2 ruling [opinion, PDF] on Monday that will make it easier for the state to get tax propositions on ballots. The court’s ruling relied on its interpretation of Proposition 218 [materials], a constitutional initiative approved by California voters in 1996 that was intended to assure that all taxes on Californian tax payers would have to gain a two-thirds voter approval before going into effect. The ruling will now limit this two-third requirement to tax proposals introduced by city and county-level governments, while initiatives introduced by citizens would only require a simple majority. Some anti-tax groups have stated [AP report] that the ruling will lead to an increase in local taxation within the state while legal experts said that Monday’s ruling was too narrow to have such a significant effect on local taxation.

This lawsuit was originally filed [SFGate report] by the

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Taft-Hartley Act became law

On June 23, 1947, the Labor-Management Relations Act (Taft-Hartley) became law over a presidential veto. The act was designed to control union excesses. Learn more about the Taft-Hartley Act.

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