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Pakistan Supreme Court allows military trials for terrorism suspects
Pakistan Supreme Court allows military trials for terrorism suspects

[JURIST] Pakistan’s Supreme Court [official website] on Wednesday ruled [opinion, PDF] to allow military trials for cases involving suspects of terrorism. The ruling follows a number of petitions to allow such trials, and is seen as a victory to the government that has been increasing its efforts against terrorism in past years. However, those opposed to the ruling are concerned over the government’s potential ability to now hold secret, speedy trials, that could violate due process of law. A Pakistani human rights group believes this ruling specifically may lead to an increased number of executions [AFP report] in Pakistan.

Pakistan, as the main place of operations of the Taliban [JURIST news archive], has been a focal point of global anti-terrorism efforts. In May, Pakistan and Afghanistan agreed to cooperate against terrorism [JURIST report] in a Landmark Intelligence Deal, in which the parties agreed to share information in relation to facilitating “coordinated intelligence operations.” In July 2014 Pakistan passed [JURIST report] a strict anti-terrorism bill that allows police to use lethal force, search buildings without a warrant and detain suspects at secret facilities for up to 60 days without charge “on reasonable apprehension of commission of a scheduled offense.” Also that year Pakistan’s prime minister pledged [JURIST report] that the country’s anti-terrorism laws would be amended to more effectively combat modern threats.