Afghanistan, Pakistan agree to cooperate against terrorism

Afghanistan, Pakistan agree to cooperate against terrorism

[JURIST] Afghanistan’s National Directorate of Security and Pakistan’s Intelligence Service on Tuesday agreed to share information in relation to facilitating “coordinated intelligence operations” in a memorandum of understanding. The agreement, the Landmark Intelligence Deal, is an attempt to bolster counterterrorism efforts [Reuters report] between the two countries who have clashed for years. Pakistan’s military spokesperson, Major General Asim Bajwa, announced the news via Twitter, and skepticism surrounding the validity of the announcement still remains.

The shared border between Pakistan and Afghanistan has proven to be a security issue [BBC backgrounder] for years. While Pakistan, as the main place of operations of the Taliban [JURIST news archive], has been a focal point of global anti-terrorism efforts, the information sharing agreement between Pakistan and Afghanistan will allow the countries to jointly focus their efforts towards combating terrorism. In July 2014 Pakistan passed [JURIST report] a strict anti-terrorism bill that allows police to use lethal force, search buildings without a warrant and detain suspects at secret facilities for up to 60 days without charge “on reasonable apprehension of commission of a scheduled offense.” Also that year Pakistan’s prime minister pledged [JURIST report] that the country’s anti-terrorism laws would be amended to more effectively combat modern threats.