US calls for consultation of controversial South Sudan legislation
US calls for consultation of controversial South Sudan legislation

[JURIST] The United States on Saturday urged the South Sudan [JURIST backgrounder] government to participate in a consultation process throughout the phases of government relating to drafting legislation, regulations, and controlling the national security service. It is reported [South Sudan Tribune report] that the current drafting of a controversial national security regulation by the South Suden government have trigger the US to speak out to help ensure the development of a non-oppressive government. US Department of State [official website] spokesperson Jen Psaki stated in regards to this issue, “[w]e are concerned that the National Security bill appears to curtail due process and is at odds with freedoms enshrined in South Sudan’s Transitional Constitution and international norms.” The recently controversial national security legislation was sent to parliament in May of 2014. Criticism for the oppressive nature of the build has created a continued effort from countries and other human rights groups to persuade the South Sudan to reconsider enactment of the bill.

South Sudan [BBC backgrounder], the world’s youngest nation, has been embroiled in a civil war since December 2013 after President Salva Kiir [BBC profile] accused his ex-vice-president, Riek Machar, of plotting to overthrow him. Last month in a briefing before the UN Security Council, Assistant Secretary-General for UN Peacekeeping Operations Edmond Mulet [UN News Centre report] discussed the ongoing humanitarian crisis in South Sudan, describing it as a “man-made crisis” [JURIST report], putting South Sudan on the “brink of a humanitarian catastrophe and a protracted internal conflict.” In May the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) [official website] released a report indicating that both sides in the South Sudan conflict are committing gross human rights violations [JURIST report].