Egypt court postpones Mubarak verdict
Egypt court postpones Mubarak verdict

[JURIST] An Egyptian court on Saturday has postponed the verdict in the retrial of former president Hosni Mubarak [Al Jazeera profile, JURIST news archive] until November 29 due to the large amount of evidence. The verdict in the case was originally scheduled [AFP report] to be announced today, however, Judge Mahmoud Kamel al-Rashidy instead announced the postponement during court. Mubarak, his former security chief Habib El-Adly and six former government aides are being retried on charges of corruption and complicity in the killing of over 100 protesters during the country’s 2011 uprising. The verdicts for seven former police commanders and Mubarak’s two sons Alaa and Gamal, accused of corruption, were also delayed [Al Jazeera report] until November. Mubarak, his sons and El-Adly will remain in custody, and the six aides will be released pending the verdict.

Mubarak and other members of his administration have been the subject of controversial judicial proceedings since the Egyptian Revolution [JURIST backgrounder]. In May an Egyptian criminal court in Cairo convicted [JURIST report] Mubarak of embezzling millions of dollars of public money and sentenced the former president to three years in prison. The court also sentenced Mubarak’s sons Alaa and Gamal to four years in prison for their role in the embezzling scheme. Last December an Egyptian court acquitted [JURIST report] former Egyptian prime minister and presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq and Alaa and Gamal Mubarak of charges of embezzling public funds. Last August Mubarak appeared in court for his retrial on complicity charges [JURIST report] in the killing of more than 100 protesters during Egypt’s 2011 uprising. The same week Mubarak was released from prison [JURIST report] and placed under house arrest at a military hospital after a court concluded that he served the maximum in time allowed in connection with the long-pending corruption case. In July lawyers for Mubarak entered [JURIST report] a not guilty plea in his retrial for alleged complicity in the 2011 killings of protesters.