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Britain is a country of animal lovers and has a long history of spearheading animal protection measures with global reach. This history can be traced back to 1822 with the introduction of Martin’s Act. The Brambell Report of 1965 and the UK joining forces with European Communities, the predecessor to the EU, in 1973 were [...]

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“A civilization that proves incapable of solving the problems that it creates is a decadent civilization.” Aimé Césaire wrote this in his critique of colonialism. Close examination of the legacy of colonialism helps explain the disparate impact of the current healthcare crisis based on race and class. The sick and dying in the US are [...]

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Universal suffrage has long been accepted as the standard for enfranchisement in democracies, however full and equal participation is rarely the reality. One group in particular that is frequently excluded across jurisdictions is prisoners. Indian law provides for this exclusion in Section 62(5) of the Representation of the People Act, 1951. This exclusion has faced [...]

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The Crisis The COVID-19 pandemic and the fact that insufficient resources exist to combat the likely tidal wave of hospital admissions will force unprecedented decisions to be made in Canada. This article recommends bioethical and legal guidelines intended to assist those responsible for the allocation of ICU beds and mechanical ventilators. Whether or not to [...]

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The US Supreme Court has temporarily postponed oral arguments; most state and local courts have as well. Yet, despite the risk posed by COVID-19, immigration courts across America continue to hold in-person removal proceedings. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) continues apprehensions. Individuals are still being placed on international flights and deported to their home countries. [...]

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Since its founding in 1959, the European Court of Human Rights — a court of last resort for disenfranchised people battling the power of often repressive regimes — has safeguarded rights and freedoms in its member states, now some 50 countries strong. Over the years, the court has forced reforms in Russian prisons, come to [...]

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The US Supreme Court has struggled for decades with how colleges and universities may use racial and ethnic preferences in admissions. At present, the law is this: (1) an institution of higher education may consider the race and ethnicity of applicants as a factor in admissions decisions for purposes of “diversity,” provided that it is [...]

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