Switzerland voters rejected ban on assisted suicide for foreigners

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On May 15, 2011, voters in the Swiss city of Zurich rejected a proposed ban on assisted suicide for foreigners as part of a plan to stem the rise of "death tourism," in which foreigners take advantage of Swiss assisted suicide laws. Assisted suicide has been legal in Switzerland since 1941 and permits a non-physician with no vested interest in a person's death to provide passive assistance such as prescribing necessary drugs. In 2010, Switzerland's Federal Council and Federal Department of Justice and Police (FDJP) had introduced legislation establishing stricter rules on assisted suicide based on a consensus of local governments and agencies. UK Director of Public Prosecutions Keir Starmer also published a policy in 2010 outlining public interest considerations against prosecution of those who assist in a suicide including, among other factors, efforts made to dissuade the victim.


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Learn more about the laws governing assisted suicide from the JURIST news archive and read commentary about the effect of UK's guidelines on assisted suicide policy from JURIST Guest Columnist Barbara Coombs Lee in Hotline.

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