DOJ dropped 'enemy combatant' classification

On March 13, 2009, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) dropped the term "enemy combatant" from its legal lexicon while limiting the range of persons eligible to be held at the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay. Summarizing a memo submitted to the US District Court for the District of Columbia, the DOJ said in a press release that the new criterion for detention "does not rely on the President's authority as Commander-in-Chief independent of Congress's specific authorization" under the Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) passed by Congress in September 2001. The AUMF authorized the use of force against nations, organizations, or persons the president determines planned, authorized, committed, or aided in the 9/11 terror attacks, or harbored such organizations or persons.



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