A Collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh
advertisement
Legal news from Wednesday, October 23, 2013
by Sung Un Kim

A federal judge on Tuesday declined to issue a preliminary injunction against the insurance subsidies provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). Judge Paul Friedman for the US District Court for the District of Columbia held that the lawsuit could proceed and that he would rule on the merits by …

[read more]
by Samuel Franklin

Australia's Commonwealth government, led by Prime Minister Tony Abbott, filed suit on Wednesday challenging the validity of the Marriage Equality Bill passed on Tuesday by the Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly, legalizing same-sex marriage. In a writ of summons filed with the country's High Court, the challenge claims that the new laws are …

[read more]
by Nicholas Tomsho

Human Rights Watch (HRW) urged the National Assembly of Vietnam to bring the country's constitution in line with international human rights standards in a letter sent Monday to Assembly chairman, Nguyen Sinh Hung. The National Assembly, Vietnam's legislative body, opened a draft constitution to public comment in January, allowing for the possibility of the …

[read more]
by Sung Un Kim

A French court on Tuesday ruled that a Franco-Moroccan couple could marry despite a circular that bans same-sex marriage. The circular explained that France's bilateral agreement with 11 countries that do not recognize same-sex marriage prohibited French civil registrars from performing marriages between same-sex couples where one party was a national of one of those …

[read more]
by Samuel Franklin

China defended its human rights record to the UN on Tuesday, insisting it was abiding by its obligations and cooperating with inquiries. Last week a group of independent UN rights experts issued a report expressing concern over harassment of activists for their attempts to participate in a UN human rights assessment of China. In response to such …

[read more]
by Bradley McAllister

UN Special Rapporteur on torture Juan Mendez on Tuesday encouraged governmental review of the UN Standard Minimum Rules for Treatment of Prisoners adopted in 1955, with particular emphasis on limiting solitary confinement. Mendez noted the rules fail to keep pace with international human rights law regarding torture, as there is no explicit language …

[read more]
by Matthew Pomy

In an open letter to the UN Security Council on Wednesday, Kenya's UN Ambassador Macharia Kamau requested that the International Criminal Court (ICC) defer the trials against Kenyan officials. Kamau emphasized the country's current security struggles and how the continued trial could prevent Kenya from fully addressing the nation's problems. The Security Council …

[read more]
by Matthew Pomy

The UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) on Wednesday recommended a rule [General Council Recommendation No. 30, PDF] surrounding the obligations states owe to women during and after conflict. The recommendation was put forward in an attempt to provide guidance to the signatories of the Convention on the Elimination of All …

[read more]
by Max Slater

Lawyers for five Guantanamo Bay inmates implicated in the 9/11 terrorist attacks on Tuesday argued that restrictive rules for classifying evidence violate the Convention Against Torture, a treaty that the US ratified in 1994. The lawyers represent Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other men accused of plotting the 9/11 attacks. At a pretrial …

[read more]
by Max Slater

Human Rights Watch (HRW) on Wednesday urged the EU to allow migrants and asylum seekers to find refuge in Europe. HRW's statement comes in the wake of a tragedy earlier this month in which hundreds of migrants drowned on their way from Libya to Italy. In its statement, HRW criticized the EU for …

[read more]
by Samuel Franklin

The US Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ruled Tuesday that a warrant is required prior to the government's attachment of a global positioning system (GPS) device to a vehicle for the purposes of monitoring the vehicle's movements. In December 2010 FBI agents affixed a "slap-on" GPS tracker to the exterior …

[read more]
by Elizabeth LaForgia

The UN special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples James Anaya on Tuesday voiced concern over the fate of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, stating that its implementation would be "difficult, if not impossible" without greater awareness of human rights values. The declaration was adopted by the General Assembly in …

[read more]

Latest Readers

@JURISTnews

Support JURIST

We rely on our readers to keep JURIST running

 Donate now!

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.