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Legal news from Friday, September 6, 2013
by Peter Snyder

The US Civilian Board of Contract Appeals has ordered the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)to pay the City of New Orleans $10.8 million in connection to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The decision, issued last week, comes in response to a June 2012 request for arbitration by the City of New …

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by Addison Morris

The EU General Court on Friday annulled sanctions imposed upon eight Iranian banks and companies, finding them unjustified. The 28-nation group has frozen assets and banned travel since 2010 for Iranian citizens thought to be linked to the nation's nuclear development. Citing insufficient evidence, the EU court nullified the sanctions on select companies and …

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by Peter Snyder

A judge for the US District Court for the Southern District of New York on Friday entered an injunction against Apple preventing the company from future antitrust violations in connection with e-book price fixing. The injunction, rendered by Judge Denise Cote, forbids Apple from making any contractual relations with publishing companies that "restricts, …

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by Lauren Laing

The increasing organized crime in Eastern Africa (EA) must be tackled both within the region and the markets where illicit goods will be delivered, according to a report published Wednesday by the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) . According to the report, in 2012 more than 100,000 people paid smugglers to transport them …

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by Addison Morris

Two independent UN human rights experts on Wednesday stressed the UK's obligation to ensure that investigative journalists are allowed protection from intimidation and punishment. Wednesday's statement comes as a reaction to the recent detention of David Miranda, partner of The Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, who has broken several stories regarding governmental surveillance activities. …

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by Kimberly Bennett

The Guardian on Thursday obtained files showing that the US National Security Agency (NSA) and its UK counterpart, the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), have compromised the guarantees that Internet companies have given consumers to reassure them that their communications are encrypted. The files, published in partnership with the New York Times and ProPublica …

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by Lauren Laing

The Supreme Court of the Netherlands on Friday ruled that the state is responsible for the deaths of three Bosnian Muslims who were murdered shortly after being forced to leave a UN designated "safe area" controlled by the Dutch Battalion (Dutchbat), during the Srebrenica massacre. The court found that Dutchbat's …

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by Kimberly Bennett

The International Labor Organization Domestic Workers Convention, 2011 (No. 189) came into force on Thursday, extending basic labor rights to workers in signatory countries. The convention became binding international law to a number of countries, prompting many to begin implementing legislative reforms aimed at improving domestic workers' labor and social rights. Approximately 53 …

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