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Legal news from Wednesday, August 21, 2013
by Theresa Donovan

A court in Cairo ordered the release of former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak on Wednesday, in a long-pending corruption case. Mubarak, now 85, still faces charges of complicity for the killing of protesters during the 2011 uprising that forced him from power. Mubarak's lawyer stated that he may be released as …

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by G. Redd

Human Rights Watch (HRW) on Tuesday called on Hamas authorities in the Gaza Strip to halt all executions, especially those of child offenders. HRW is especially concerned with the specific case of Hani Abu Aliyan, an adult prisoner sentenced to death for the murder of a peer while he was a …

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by Theresa Donovan

US Military Judge Denise Lind on Wednesday sentenced Army Pfc. Bradley Manning to 35 years in prison for his disclosure of classified information to the anti-secrecy organization Wikileaks. Manning was found guilty last month of violating the Espionage Act [18 USC § 794 et seq., text] but was acquitted of the …

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by Endia Vereen

The New Zealand parliament on Wednesday approveda bill expanding the power of the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB). Approved in a 61-59 vote, the legislation gives the GCSB increased power to support other state departments including the New Zealand police, Defense Force and the Security Intelligence Service. The hotly contested legislation was reportedly opposed by over …

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by Endia Vereen

The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California (ACLU) said Wednesday that they have uncovered a discriminatory national security program used by the US government to screen immigrants. In a lawsuit against the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) alleging discriminatory practices in the denial of citizenship applications, the ACLU claims to have …

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by Julie Deisher-Edwards

A judge for the US District Court for the Northern District of California granted permission on Tuesday for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) to force-feed select inmates who are near death, even if the inmates had previously signed orders asking not to be resuscitated. California authorities went to the court …

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by Peter Snyder

A member of the controversial feminist rock collective Pussy Riot filed a lawsuit Tuesday against her former defense lawyer. Group member Yekaterina Samutsevic accused her former lawyer Violetta Volkova of making and posting defamatory statements about her in the press and on social networking sites during the trial of …

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by G. Redd

The constitutional court of Zimbabwe ruled Tuesday that July's presidential elections were fair, effectively allowing President Robert Mugabe to continue his 33-year rule. This ruling is controversial because the complaint by presidential hopeful Morgan Tsvangirai of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) was withdrawn last week, citing corruption of the …

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by Julie Deisher-Edwards

The North Carolina Court of Appeals on Tuesday ruled that a North Carolina law prohibiting registered sex offenders from commercial social networking websites accessible by children, such as Facebook and Myspace, is unconstitutional. In a unanimous opinion, the court found that the law "arbitrarily burdens" registered sex offenders by preventing a wide …

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by Peter Snyder

The International Labor Organization (ILO) Maritime Labor Convention came into effect Tuesday. The international standards, originally adopted by the ILO in 2006, required ratification by a minimum of 30 ILO member states to come into force as international law, with the additional requirement that the countries ratifying the standards represent 33 percent of the …

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