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Legal news from Wednesday, June 26, 2013
by Theresa Donovan

The US Supreme Court ruled Wednesday in Sekhar v. United States that attempting to compel a person to recommend that his employer approve an investment does not constitute "the obtaining of property from another" under the Hobbs Act [18 USC § 1951(a)]. In this case, Sekhar allegedly threatened the attorney for …

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by G. Redd

Lebanese police forces are targeting and torturing drug users, sex workers and members of LGBT communities, according to a report released Wednesday by Human Rights Watch (HRW). The report, released on the UN International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, included quotes from members of those demographics claiming that various forms …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The US Supreme Court ruled in two landmark same-sex marriage cases Wednesday. In United States v. Windsor, the court ruled 5-4 that Section 3 of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is unconstitutional. Under DOMA, couples in same-sex marriages legally recognized by a state were denied …

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by Sydney Normil

Human Rights Watch (HRW) and the Human Rights Monitoring Institute on Tuesday urged Lithuania to reopen its investigation into secret CIA prisons that may have operated in the country from 2001-2006. In 2010 Lithuania launched an investigation into illegal detentions but closed it a year later. Lithuania has refused to disclose the information from …

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by Sydney Normil

UN Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons urged Morocco on Tuesday to adopt a victim-centered approach to combat human trafficking in the country. Joy Ngozi Ezeilo said "ictims of trafficking are most often not being identified or being misidentified as smuggled and/or irregular migrants due the absence …

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by Laura Klein Mullen

A Saudi Arabian court on Monday sentenced human rights activist Abdulkarim al-Khader to eight years in prison for sedition. Abdulkarim al-Khader was one of the founders of the Saudi Civil and Political Rights Association (ACPRA), which aimed to increase awareness of civil rights in the country. He was sentenced to prison after the …

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by Laura Klein Mullen

The International Crimes Tribunal Bangladesh (ICTB) on Monday ordered Chowdhury Mueen-Uddin and Ashrafuzzaman Khan to be tried in absentia for the murders of 19 intellectuals and 11 crimes against humanity committed during the 1971 independence war. Khan is a US citizen, and Mueee-Uddin is a British Muslim leader. Their alleged victims included nine teachers, …

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