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Legal news from Tuesday, March 19, 2013
by Andrew Morgan

The Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism on Monday released its annual State of the News Media Report. Among other notable findings, the report says (for all intents and purposes) that more people should be reading, and contributing to, JURIST. Okay, so maybe it doesn't say that explicitly, but it's a short step …

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by Blake Lynch

Ahmed Qaddaf al-Dam, cousin of Muammar Gaddafi, was arrested at his home Tuesday in central Cairo by Libyan forces. The arrest of Qaddaf al-Dam coincides with the second anniversary of the air campaign commenced in Libya by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) that assisted rebels in toppling Gaddafi's regime. Qaddaf al-Dam, …

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by Jaimie Cremeans

The US Supreme Court ruled Tuesday in The Standard Fire Insurance Co. v. Knowles that a stipulation by one member of a class in a class action to keep damages below $5 million does not, for the purpose of diversity jurisdiction, bind the whole class. The Class Action Fairness Act of 2005 [text, …

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by Daniel Mullen

The Supreme Court of the Philippines on Tuesday temporarily blocked implementation of a law that provides for state funding of contraceptives. The legislation, which was signed into law last year following approval by the Philippines legislature, establishes sex education requirements in schools, provides for government funding of contraceptives and other family planning …

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by Peter Snyder

Citigroup, Inc. agreed on Monday to pay out $730 million to settle a lawsuit brought by investors claiming the financial services corporation misled debt investors about its condition during the financial crisis. According to a statement from Citigroup, the agreement will settle "a class action lawsuit brought on behalf of investors who purchased Citigroup debt and …

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by Samuel Franklin

Zimbabweans approved a new constitution that limits future presidents to two five-year terms, the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission said on Tuesday. In a nationwide referendum on Saturday nearly 95 percent of voters supported the passage of the draft constitution, paving the way for elections later this year. The vote comes on the heels of a …

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by Dan Taglioli

Congolese war crimes suspect Gen. Bosco Ntaganda surrendered himself to a US embassy in Rwanda on Monday and requested extradition to the International Criminal Court (ICC). Ntaganda has been wanted by the ICC since 2006 on charges enlisting and conscripting children under the age of 15 and of using them to …

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by Julie Deisher-Edwards

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay lauded Guatemala on Monday for beginning the trial of former president Efrain Rios Montt and former intelligence chief Jose Rodriguez Sanchez, both of whom stand accused of committing genocide and crimes against humanity. The charges relate back to the 36-year Guatemalan civil war [BBC …

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by Julia Zebley

The US Supreme Court granted certiorari in three new cases Monday. In Madigan v. Levin [docket; cert. petition, PDF] the court will consider whether age discrimination claimants can circumvent the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) and bring claims directly under the Equal Protection clause and 42 USC § 1983 …

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by Julia Zebley

The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments Monday in Arizona v. Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc. to consider Arizona's 2004 Proposition 200, which requires citizens to show "proof of citizenship" in addition to photo identification, to vote. Attorneys for Arizona argued that the law does not contravene the National Voter Registration …

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