Legal news from Friday, February 8, 2013

[JURIST] The US Department of Justice (DOJ) [official website] announced [press release] Friday that a settlement has been reached with Holtzbrinck Publishers LLC, known by the public as Macmillan [corporate website], over allegations that the publishing company conspired with Apple to raise the retail price of e-books. The DOJ's Antitrust … [read more]

[JURIST] The Congress of the Philippines [official website] on Wednesday passed a bill [text, PDF] to protect the rights of more than one million internally displaced persons (IDPs). The bill was praised [press release] by the UN Refugee Agency [official website] on Friday. If the bill is signed into law, … [read more]

[JURIST] The Arkansas Senate [official website] on Thursday approved revisions to the state's lethal injection law. The Arkansas Supreme Court [official website] struck down the 2009 version of the law [JURIST report] last year, finding that a provision allowing the state department of corrections to choose the drug for lethal … [read more]

[JURIST] Senegal's newly-created Extraordinary African Chambers officially opened on Friday to prepare for the prosecution of former Chadian dictator Hissene Habre [BBC backgrounder]. Senegal's national assembly adopted a law in December allowing for the creation of the special tribunal [JURIST report] with the support of the African Union (AU) [official … [read more]

[JURIST] Turkey's parliament [official website, in Turkish] on Thursday approved legislation to prohibit terrorism financing. In passing this legislation [ANA report], Turkey may have narrowly avoided expulsion from the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) [official webpage]. Turkish President Abduallah Gul [BBC profile] now has 15 days to approve the legislation, … [read more]

[JURIST] An appeals court judge in Haiti on Thursday ordered former president Jean-Claude Duvalier [CBC profile; JURIST news archive] to face charges of abusing human rights. Duvalier returned to Haiti in 2011 after 25 years in exile, prompting an investigation [BBC report] for crimes he committed from 1971-1986. Last January … [read more]

[JURIST] US District Judge James Robart on Thursday restricted the patent lawsuit by Google subsidiary Motorola Mobility against Microsoft [corporate websites]. The judge ruled [Reuters report] that certain parts of three different Motorola patents were not valid. Motorola has sought $4 billion for alleged violations of its wireless and video … [read more]

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