Legal news from Wednesday, January 19, 2011
14:01 EDT

[JURIST] The Somali Parliament [official website] on Tuesday rejected legislation designed to combat piracy [JURIST news archive]. The bill, introduced last week by government officials, seeks to criminalize piracy and improve internal mechanisms for trying alleged offenders. Lawmakers expressed reservations [AFP report] about the bill, including concerns about its necessity [read more]

14:01 EDT

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website; JURIST news archive] on Wednesday ruled [opinion, PDF] in Harrington v. Richter [Cornell LII backgrounder; JURIST report] that the section of the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (AEDPA) [28 USC § 2254 text] limiting federal review of state court decisions to decisions [read more]

13:01 EDT

[JURIST] Afghan President Hamid Karzai [official profile, JURIST news archive] on Wednesday announced a one-month postponement in the seating of the country's new parliament, following a request by a high court judicial tribunal asking for more time to look into allegations of fraud surrounding last September's parliamentary elections [IEC backgrounder]. [read more]

13:01 EDT

[JURIST] The US Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit [official website] unanimously ruled [opinion, PDF] Tuesday to uphold the affirmative action [JURIST news archive] policy of considering race in student admissions at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) [academic website]. The plaintiffs, two Caucasian students, were denied undergraduate [read more]

13:01 EDT

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website; JURIST news archive] on Wednesday unanimously overturned [opinion, PDF] a lower court's ruling [JURIST report] in NASA v. Nelson [Cornell LII backgrounder; JURIST report] and upheld the background checks that NASA uses for employees of companies working under contract. In 2008 the Court [read more]

13:01 EDT

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website; JURIST news archive] heard oral arguments [day call, PDF; merit briefs] Wednesday in FCC v. AT&T [oral arguments transcript, PDF; JURIST report] on whether exemption 7(C) [DOJ backgrounder] of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) [5 USC § 552] applies to corporations. Under [read more]

13:01 EDT

[JURIST] The US Department of Justice (DOJ) [official website] on Tuesday appealed a ruling that found the minimum coverage provision of the recently enacted health care reform law [HR 3590 text; JURIST news archive] unconstitutional. The government filed a notice of appeal [text, PDF] in the US District Court for [read more]

12:01 EDT

[JURIST] The human rights group Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) [advocacy website] released a report [PHP report, text; press release] Wednesday detailing human rights abuses in Myanmar. The report revealed eight violations that fall under the purview of the International Criminal Court (ICC) [official website] and may be classified as [read more]

12:01 EDT

[JURIST] The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) [official website] on Monday commenced the trial [press release] of Idelphonse Nizeyimana [BBC profile] on charges related to his role in the 1994 Rwandan genocide [HRW backgrounder]. Nizeyimana, nicknamed "Butcher of Butare" [RNW report], faces four counts of genocide, complicity in genocide, [read more]

10:01 EDT

[JURIST] A judge for the Jerusalem District Court on Wednesday ordered suspected Bosnian war criminal Aleksander Cvetkovic held in jail while the Israeli government attempts to extradite him to Bosnia to stand trial for crimes committed during the 1992-1995 Bosnian Civil War [JURIST news archive]. The Israeli State Attorney's Office [read more]

09:01 EDT

[JURIST] A three-judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit [official website] ruled [opinion, PDF] Tuesday that the US government does not have to release non-redacted transcripts relating to the interrogation of certain "high value" detainees at Guantanamo Bay [JURIST news archive]. The court [read more]

08:01 EDT

[JURIST] Former Haitian president Jean-Claude Duvalier [BBC Profile; JURIST news archive was charged Tuesday with corruption, theft, misappropriation of funds and other unnamed crimes. Duvalier underwent several hours of questioning, and, although he was released, he does not have the right to leave Haiti. Duvalier returned to Haiti [BBC report] [read more]

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