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Legal news from Friday, December 10, 2010
by Jaclyn Belczyk

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled Thursday that prosecutors can indict a genetic profile in a rape case, even if they do not know the suspect's name. The ruling will allow prosecutors to indict suspects based on a DNA profile so that once the suspect is identified the prosecution will not be barred by the statute of …

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by Dwyer Arce

Chinese human rights activist Liu Xiaobo was awarded the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize in absentia Friday in Oslo, Norway. The prize was laid in an empty chair following the ceremony. It would normally be presented to either the recipient or a close relative, as has been the case with other laureates who were being …

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by Dwyer Arce

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay on Thursday criticized actions by governments and corporations to cut off funding to WikiLeaks, saying it could violate the website's rights to free expression. The comments come following efforts from the US government and US-based companies to cut ties with the controversial website, responsible for …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

Chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) Luis Moreno-Ocampo told the UN Security Council Thursday that Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir is deliberately protecting those accused of committing genocide in Darfur. Moreno-Ocampo said that violence has been ongoing and that hundreds of civilians …

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by Megan McKee

A court in the Italian town of Parma on Thursday convicted the founder and former chief executive of dairy giant Parmalat SpA, Calisto Tanzi, for the company's fraudulent bankruptcy, sentencing him to 18 years. The court said that Tanzi and the 14 former executives sentenced with him will have to reimburse the …

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by Megan McKee

A French court decided Thursday to combine two separate cases involving misuse of public funds brought against former president Jacques Chirac, leaving him to face only one trial this spring. It is said that France's Court of Cassation ordered the Paris court to consolidate the two cases [Fance …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The US Senate failed Thursday to advance a vote on a bill to repeal the military's controversial "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy (DADT) [10 USC § 654; JURIST news archive], which prohibits openly gay men and women from serving in the armed forces. The Senate fell three votes short of the 60 votes necessary …

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