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Legal news from Friday, November 12, 2010
by Zach Zagger

A Chinese court ruled Friday against a man who claimed he was denied a teaching job because he is HIV-positive, in China's first HIV/AIDs employment discrimination lawsuit. The man, known only by the alias Xiao Wu, said that he passed requisite academic tests and interviews for the job but was denied after his health examination. He brought …

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by Matt Glenn

The US Supreme Court on Friday refused to vacate a stay issued by the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit allowing the military to continue enforcing its Don't Ask Don't Tell (DADT) [10 USC § 654; JURIST news archive] policy while the government appeals a September decision [JURIST …

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by John Paul Putney

The Rwandan high court ruled Friday that opposition leader Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza will remain jailed for the duration of her trial on charges of forming a terrorist organization. Judge Johnstone Busingyi indicated that his decision was based on Ingabire's threat to state security. The ruling follows an appeal of Tuesday's decision to …

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by Ashley Hileman

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) filed a class action lawsuit Wednesday over a US military policy that cuts the separation pay of honorably discharged gay and lesbian service members in half. The ACLU filed the lawsuit on behalf of all service members involuntarily discharged in the last six years who were otherwise …

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by Julia Zebley

The Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) on Friday accused former Cabinet minster William Ruto of interfering with the International Criminal Court (ICC) investigation into the 2007 post-election violence, denying accusations of bribing witnesses. Two witnesses, Ken Braziz Wekesa and William Kepkemboi Rono, claimed Tuesday that they were bribed by the …

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by Drew Singer

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) on Thursday published an open letter to US Attorney General Eric Holder, urging him to investigate former president George W. Bush for violation of the federal statute prohibiting torture. In his recently published memoirs, Bush admitted to …

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by Brian Jackson

The trial of eight men accused of killing Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) human rights activist Floribert Chebeya began in the capital city of Kinshasa on Friday. The eight accused men are all DRC policemen, but only five are currently before the court, as three are still at-large. The eight men face charges of …

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by Megan McKee

A Lebanese military court on Friday convicted cleric Omar Bakri Mohammed of terrorism and sentenced him to life in prison. Bakri was found guilty of belonging to an armed group that plotted to carry out terrorist acts against Lebanese soldiers and was sentenced along with 54 others who fought in clashes with the Lebanese army in 2007. …

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by Daniel Makosky

The Azerbaijani Supreme Court on Thursday partially overturned the convictions of imprisoned Azeri journalist Enyulla Fatullayev. The court vacated [RFE/RL report] Fatullayev's convictions for committing defamation and inciting terror and ethnic hatred and ruled that his sentence for tax evasion is complete. The ruling comes one month after the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) …

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by Daniel Makosky

European Commissioner for Digital Agenda Neelie Kroes on Thursday said that existing regulations to ensure net neutrality are adequate for the time being. Kroes spoke following a four-month fact-finding period on net neutrality, a concept by which the open flow of information over the Internet is protected regardless of the amount …

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