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Legal news from Monday, November 8, 2010
by Matt Glenn

The Court of Justice of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) ruled Monday that the Nigerien military junta should release ousted president Mamadou Tandja whom they have held since deposing him in a February coup. The court, which does not have the power to make the junta comply …

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by Matt Glenn

The Supreme Court of South Korea on Monday upheld an appellate court decision that sentenced a defendant to a two-year suspended sentence for possessing instrumental music with titles praising North Korea. Prosecutors charged the defendant, identified only by her last name Song, with violating South Korea's National Security Act, which prohibits people from disseminating materials that promote …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments Monday in Costco v. Omega on whether the first-sale doctrine [17 USC § 109(a)], which provides that the owner of any particular copy "lawfully made under this title" may resell that good without the authority of …

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by Ann Riley

The Hague Court of Appeals on Monday prohibited the eviction of squatters in Amsterdam, The Hauge, and Leeuwarden. In an oral ruling, the court relied on the European Convention on Human Rights, asserting that a person cannot be forced from a home without a prior affirmation from a judge that …

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by Ashley Hileman

The European Union (EU) on Monday criticized the Myanmar government for failing to take the necessary steps to ensure a free, fair and inclusive electoral process for the country's first elections in over 20 years. The EU noted that many aspects of the elections, which were held Sunday, were incompatible with internationally accepted standards, …

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by LaToya Sawyer

Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard on Monday announced a national referendum that seeks to include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the Australian Constitution. Currently, although Aborigines make up almost three percent of the Australian population, they are not mentioned in the Constitution. The referendum will be among Australia's first steps in efforts to …

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by Ann Riley

The US Supreme Court on Monday unanimously ruled that lower federal courts may not issue writs of habeas corpus to state prisoners unless their confinement violates federal law. The court overturned a ruling by the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Wilson v. Corcoran, which granted …

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by Eryn Correa

The US Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear the first preliminary challenge to the recently enacted health care reform law. Former California lawmaker Steve Baldwin, along with the Pacific Justice Institute filed for a writ of certiorari in September, asking the court to review …

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by Carrie Schimizzi

The Taiwan Supreme Prosecutors Office on Monday announced the indictment of 13 people, including three High Court judges, on charges of bribery, corruption and money laundering. The three judges are accused of accepting more than NT $5 million (USD $155,000) from former legislator Ho Chi-Hui [JURIST news …

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