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Legal news from Tuesday, November 2, 2010
by Sarah Paulsworth

Google has filed a lawsuit against the US Department of Interior (DOI) alleging that the DOI arbitrarily decided only to allow Microsoft to compete for a contract to overhaul its e-mail system. According to the lawsuit, filed Friday in the US Court of Federal Claims, the DOI decided …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in Schwarzenegger v. Entertainment Merchants Association on whether the First Amendment permits any limits on offensive content in violent video games sold to minors, and whether a state regulation for displaying offensive, harmful images …

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by Julia Zebley

The Administrative Tribunal of Versailles on Tuesday cancelled an order refusing a residency permit to Agathe Habyarimana, widow of assasinated Rwandan president Juvenal Habyarimana, ordering that her application be reconsidered. The reconsideration gives Habyarimana more time to defend against extradition attempts by the Rwandan government. The court denied her residency permit …

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by Sarah Paulsworth

Imprisoned Russian oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky linked the fate of Russia with the outcome of his trial in his closing statements on Tuesday in his trial for money laundering and embezzlement. Prosecutors allege that Khodorkovsky and a group of investors embezzled more than $100 million from his former company Yukos …

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by John Paul Putney

UN Special Rapporteur on racism and human rights lawyer Githu Muigai said Monday that racism is increasing as a result of xenophobic teachings and violence. Delivering two reports to the UN General Assembly, Maugai said that states must enforce internationally recognized standards and prevent discrimination. Muigai identified immigrants in particular as bearing the brunt of xenophobic intolerance …

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by Jay Carmella

Yemeni prosecutors on Tuesday charged US citizen and radical Muslim cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, with incitement to kill foreigners. Awlaki, a suspected member of al Qaeda who is believed to be hiding in Yemen, was charged in absentia. US officials have labeled Awlaki as a terrorist and have placed him on …

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by Maureen Cosgrove

The Uruguayan Supreme Court ruled Monday that amnesty granted for crimes committed by the country's 12-year dictatorship is unconstitutional. The Expiry Law, adopted in 1986, granted amnesty to military officials accused of human rights violations during the country's 1973-1985 dictatorship. The court's ruling will allow investigators to proceed [El …

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by Sarah Posner

Palestinian detainees have been subjected to "cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment," and at times torture by Israel's Shin Bet Security Agency in violation of international and domestic law, according to a report released Tuesday by human rights groups B'Tselem and HaMoked. The details of the report, "Kept in the Dark," are based on …

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by Eryn Correa

Branch 15 of the Revolutionary Court of Iran on Saturday sentenced Iranian human rights lawyer Mohammed Seifzadeh to nine years in prison and a 10-year ban from practicing law. Seifzadeh was charged [RFE/RL report] with acting against national security in establishing the Defender of Human Rights Center (DHRC), an organization that issues …

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by Carrie Schimizzi

A three-judge panel for the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on Monday ordered an indefinite extension of its temporary stay preventing the suspension of the US military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" (DADT) [10 USC § 654; JURIST news archive] policy. The new order will extend the government's emergency motion [text, …

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by Zach Zagger

Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs Lawrence Cannon told the House of Commons Monday that the Harper administration has agreed to accept Guantanamo Bay detainee and convicted terrorist Omar Khadr after he serves the first year of his sentence in Guantanamo. The announcement comes the day after a …

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by Zach Zagger

A three-judge panel of US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit heard oral arguments Monday on Arizona's controversial immigration law. The US Department of Justice (DOJ) has argued that parts of the law are unconstitutional while others are preempted by federal law. John Bouma, representing Arizona and Arizona …

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