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Legal news from Friday, October 8, 2010
by Zach Zagger

Chinese human rights activist Liu Xiaobo was announced Friday as the winner of the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize, "for his long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China." Liu has been one of China's most prominent dissidents. He spent two years in prison following the Tiananmen Square uprising, …

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by Matt Glenn

The European Parliament voted Thursday to support increased government scrutiny of deepwater drilling off Europe's coasts, but voted not to ban the practice as the Environmental Committee had urged. The resolution, passed in response to April's Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico calls …

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by Brian Jackson

The US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on Thursday upheld Washington's ban on voting by felons, reversing a prior ruling by a three-judge panel. That ban is enshrined in Article VI of the state constitution, which bars from voting, "All persons convicted of infamous crime unless restored to their civil rights." The …

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by Matt Glenn

Myanmar's Supreme Court announced Friday that it will hold a hearing October 18 to decide whether to consider an appeal filed in May by pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi challenging her continued house arrest. The hearing will occur less than a month before November 13, when Suu Kyi's house …

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by Drew Singer

The appeals chamber of the International Criminal Court (ICC) ruled Friday that proceedings can continue against accused Congolese militia leader Thomas Lubanga Dyilo. The trial chamber had ordered Lubanga's release in July after previously ordering a stay in the proceedings until the prosecution complied with a directive to …

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by Brian Jackson

The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) on Thursday requested UN assistance in relocating former Rwandan transportation minister Andre Ntagerura. Ntagerura is presently living in Tanzania, with the ICTR paying for his accommodations. He was acquitted in 2004 of charges of playing a role in the 1994 genocide [JURIST news archive. The ICTR has been …

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by Megan McKee

The majority of Bolivian newspapers engaged in a joint protest Thursday against a proposed anti-racism law that they claim would damage freedom of expression. The newspapers shared one message on their front page, "There is no democracy without freedom of expression," in response to a decision by President Evo Morales [official profile, …

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by Megan McKee

A judge for the US District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan ruled Thursday that a provision of the recently enacted health care reform law requiring all individuals to maintain health insurance or pay a penalty is constitutional. The suit, filed in March by conservative public …

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by Daniel Makosky

The League of Human Rights (LDH) on Thursday accused French authorities of improperly collecting DNA samples from Roma migrants. French police may collect samples of genetic material from indicted individuals, though the organization contends that police have subjected the Roma to such procedures without being either arrested or charged. The …

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by Daniel Makosky

India's National Investigation Agency (NIA) announced on Thursday that it has secured INTERPOL red notices for five Pakistani citizens, including two military officials, for their suspected involvement in the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks that killed 166. The red notices stem from NIA's investigation into US …

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