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Legal news from Thursday, January 21, 2010
by Sarah Miley

Police in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) arrested two former Bosnian Serb detention camp guards on Thursday who were allegedly responsible for the death of around 50 civilians and Bosnian soldiers during the Bosnian civil war. Ratko Dronjak was commander of a detention camp in the village of Kamenica, which held prisoners between 1992 and …

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by Jonathan Cohen

The Parliament of the Republic of Angola approved a new constitution on Thursday that would end the popular election of the president, despite the refusal of opposition party UNITA to take part in the vote. The new constitution replaces an interim constitution that had been in place since 1975. It provides …

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by Haley Wojdowski

A Moscow court on Thursday rejected an appeal of a lower court ruling that denied recognition of a marriage between two women. The couple, Irina Fedotova-Fet and Irina Shepitko, applied for a marriage license in March, but were refused by the registry. The women appealed to the Tverskoi District Court in Moscow, arguing that nothing in the Russian Constitution …

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by Daniel Makosky

French police on Wednesday arrested alleged war criminal Sosthene Munyemana in Bordeaux, acting on a Rwandan extradition warrant. Munyemana, a Rwandan doctor who has worked in a French hospital for eight years, is accused of war crimes related to the 1994 Rwandan genocide. He was later released on bail while …

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by Brian Jackson

Amin Mohamed Durrani, a member of the "Toronto 18", was released Thursday after pleading guilty in a Canadian court Wednesday to participating in and assisting a terrorist group. Durrani's plea, which came as a surprise to many, included an apology and a denunciation of terrorism. As part of the plea …

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by Bhargav Katikaneni

The North Korean government is holding approximately 200,000 dissidents in six prison camps spread throughout the country, according to a report released Wednesday by the South Korean government's National Human Rights Commission of Korea (NHRCK). According to the report, punishments for dissidents have increased significantly for common offenses such …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The US Supreme Court on Thursday decided 5-4 in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission to ease restrictions on political campaign spending by corporations. The Court was asked to consider Section 203 of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (BCRA), which prohibits corporations and unions from using their …

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by Zach Zagger

A federal employee filed suit on Wednesday against the federal government seeking to add her same-sex spouse to her family health insurance plan. Lambda Legal brought the suit in the US District Court for the Northern District of California on behalf of Karen Golinski, a federal court employee who was married in California …

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by Bhargav Katikaneni

The Italian Senate approved a bill Wednesday that aims to shorten the trial and appeals process by putting strict time limits on its duration. The legislation would limit the three stages of a case - trial, initial appeal, and final appeal - to between 6.5 and 10 years depending on …

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by Andrea Bottorff

A Russian journalist died in a Siberian hospital on Wednesday from injuries he received during a police beating nearly two weeks ago, according to local investigators. Konstantin Popov, an economics writer for a Russian newspaper, was arrested for drunkenness on January 4 and taken to prison, where police officer Alexei Mitayev …

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by Matt Glenn

Federal courts provide an effective venue for prosecuting terror suspects, securing convictions in 89 percent of cases since 2001, according to a report released Wednesday by New York University's Center on Law and Security. The report found that in recent years, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) has prosecuted fewer …

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by Matt Glenn

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton signed an order Wednesday authorizing two previously excluded Muslim scholars who strongly criticized US foreign policy to enter the country. During the Bush administration, the US government barred professors Tariq Ramadan of Oxford University and Adam Habib of the University of Johannesburg from entering …

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