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Legal news from Tuesday, January 5, 2010
by Jaclyn Belczyk

A White House spokesperson said Tuesday that the US government will suspend transfers of Guantanamo Bay detainees to Yemen. White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs made the announcement at his daily briefing amid increasing political pressure not to transfer any more detainees to Yemen after it was revealed that the man who attempted to detonate …

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by Andrea Bottorff

Israeli officials said Tuesday that a military delegation had canceled a trip to the UK over fears that they would be arrested on war crimes charges for their involvement in last year's Operation Cast Lead in the Gaza Strip. Israeli Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Danny Ayalon met Tuesday in Jerusalem with UK Attorney …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled Tuesday that the president has broad authority to detain suspected terrorists, finding that the detention of Yemeni Guantanamo Bay detainee Ghaleb Nassar Al-Bihani is authorized under domestic law. In its first Guantanamo habeas ruling since the US Supreme …

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by Haley Wojdowski

Andal Ampatuan Jr., mayor of the southern Philippine town of Datu Unsay, pleaded not guilty on Tuesday to 41 counts of murder related to the November massacre in Maguindanao province that left 57 dead. Prosecutors allege that Ampatuan and a large group of his men took a party of his opposition's supporters and journalists to a remote …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

Iranian Interior Minister Mostafa Mohammad Najjar on Tuesday warned opposition activists that they could execution if they continue anti-government protests. Najjar's statement came one day after the Intelligence Ministry announced that several foreigners were among those arrested in last month's violent protests. Najjar said that the foreigners would also face punishment if …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The two parties in a prosecutorial immunity dispute before the US Supreme Court announced a settlement Monday, ending the case. The case was Pottawattamie County v. McGhee, in which the Court had been asked to consider whether a prosecutor may be subjected to a civil trial and potential damages for …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

Civil rights groups on Monday opposed stricter screening procedures for passengers entering the US from 14 countries, calling the measures unconstitutional. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) called on the US government to "adhere to longstanding standards of individualized suspicion and enact security measures that are the least threatening to civil liberties …

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