A Collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh
advertisement
Legal news from Friday, November 13, 2009
by Jaclyn Belczyk

US Attorney General Eric Holder said Friday that Canadian Guantanamo detainee Omar Khadr will likely be tried in the US military commission system. Speaking during a news conference Friday after announcing that five 9/11 conspirators will be tried in US federal court, Holder responded …

[read more]
by Sarah Miley

The White House announced Friday that Gregory Craig is resigning as White House Counsel and will be replaced by Bob Bauer, Obama's personal attorney. Craig's resignation, effective in January, comes after months of criticism of his management of Guantanamo Bay policy initiatives, including the ban on torture and …

[read more]
by Patrice Collins

The Greek Orthodox Church is urging Europeans to unite in protesting a European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) decision to ban the crucifix from state schools, according to Thursday reports. The Archbishop of the Greek Orthodox Church, Ieronymos of Thebes and Livadia, has called an emergency meeting of …

[read more]
by Sarah Paulsworth

Opposition pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi filed an appeal in Myanmar's highest court on Friday challenging the 18-month extension of her house arrest. The head of Suu Kyi's legal team Kyi Win said that now that the appeal has been submitted to the High Court, they must wait to learn whether …

[read more]
by Andrew Morgan

US Attorney General Eric Holder on Friday announced that the government will pursue federal charges against five men accused of conspiring to commit the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Ramzi Bin Al Shibh, Walid Bin Attash, Ali Abdul-Aziz Ali, and Mustafa Ahmed Al Hawsawi, all currently detained at Guantanamo Bay …

[read more]
by Andrea Bottorff

UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) Director of Defense and Strategic Threats, Simon Manley, criticized Britain's High Court Thursday for jeopardizing national security by ordering the public release of evidence of alleged torture of terrorism suspects. Manley accused the British judges of eroding trust between UK and foreign security officials, which he said …

[read more]
by Zach Zagger

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) filed a new plan Thursday for reducing prison overcrowding in the state. The new plan includes revisions made possible because of legislative enactments, including summary parole for lower-level offenses to reduce the amount of inmates re-entering the prison system for parole violations and credit …

[read more]
by Brian Jackson

The Salt Lake City Council has passed an a ordinance prohibiting employment and housing discrimination based on sexual orientation, after the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) gave its support. The ordinance, passed unanimously on Tuesday, makes Salt Lake City the first city in Utah to outlaw such discrimination. Michael Otterson, …

[read more]
by Brian Jackson

The US government on Thursday amended a complaint against Islamic charity the Alavi Foundation to include a request for the seizure of assets, including four mosques, claiming that the organization is actually controlled by the Iranian government. The amended complaint, originally filed in 2008, alleges that Alavi is funneling assets to fund Iran's nuclear program in …

[read more]
by Daniel Makosky

More than 18,000 refugees have been unfairly denied permanent residency or asylum in the US due to the expanding definition of "terrorist activity" in the USA Patriot Act and Real ID Act, according to a report released Wednesday by Human Rights First (HRF). …

[read more]

Latest Readers

@JURISTnews

Support JURIST

We rely on our readers to keep JURIST running

 Donate now!

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.