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Legal news from Wednesday, July 15, 2009
by Andrew Morgan

US Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor told the US Senate during confirmation hearings on Wednesday said that she has rejected personal bias and "ruled according to the law" in abortion-related cases. During questioning by Senator John Cornyn (R-TX), Sotomayor said that the White House did not ask …

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by Christian Ehret

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin urged lawmakers Tuesday to pass an antitrust bill that would impose criminal penalties for unfair competition. The Federal Anti-Monopoly Service said that the current law is too vague and prevents criminal punishment. The draft …

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by Andrew Morgan

Dutch Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende said Tuesday that the Netherlands would be willing to consider accepting Guantanamo Bay detainees, despite earlier statements to the contrary. Meeting with US President Barack Obama in Washington, DC, Balkenende said that his country might accept transferred detainees if it would help to …

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by Christian Ehret

The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is engaging in more vigorous enforcement of its rules and policies in order to address the financial crisis and improve investor protection, Chairman Mary Schapiro testified before the US House of Representatives Subcommittee on Capital Markets, Insurance and Government-Sponsored Enterprises Tuesday. Schapiro testified that proposed …

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by Christian Ehret

The number of deaths during post-election protests in Tehran exceeds government reports, the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran (ICHRI) reported Wednesday. The rights group claims that at least 34 demonstrators died on June 20, contrary to government reports of 11 deaths on that day and 20 deaths total since the disputed June 12 …

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by Andrew Morgan

The International Maritime Bureau (IMB) reported on Wednesday that pirate attacks around the globe have doubled in the first half of 2009. The bulk of the upsurge has come from increased activity in the Gulf of Aden and Somali coastal waters, where 130 incidents occurred since January. The report attributes a lull in activity in …

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by Christian Ehret

The US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit on Tuesday ordered new arguments in the case of convicted terrorist Zacarias Moussaoui. The court is rehearing the case due to the retirement of Chief Judge Karen Williams, who heard oral arguments in January. Williams announced last week [Times and …

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by Ingrid Burke

The US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit on Tuesday dissolved an injunction that had previously barred the enforcement of a controversial abortion notification law in Illinois. Having been the subject of numerous court challenges, the Parental Notice of Abortion Act of 1995 was most recently enjoined by the US District …

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by Brian Jackson

The prosecution in the trial of Congolese militia leader Thomas Lubanga Dyilo concluded its case on Tuesday after presenting 22 weeks of testimony. The trial, occurring at the International Criminal Court (ICC) at The Hague, began in January, nearly three years after ICC prosecutors applied for an arrest warrant. Lubanga [Al-Jazeera …

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by Brian Jackson

The Lithuanian parliament on Tuesday approved a bill that would prohibit children from being exposed to information on a number of topics, including homosexuality. The parliament overrode the veto of former president Valdas Adamkus, who had rejected an earlier vote by the parliament to pass the bill. Under Lithuanian law, current president Dalia Grybauskaite cannot …

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