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Legal news from Friday, June 12, 2009
by Christian Ehret

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a brief Friday to petition the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit to rehear a state secrets privilege case en banc. A three-judge panel for the Ninth Circuit previously ruled that the state secrets privilege does not …

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by Christian Ehret

The US House of Representatives on Friday approved the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, which attempts to safeguard the public by granting the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) certain authority to regulate tobacco products, among other provisions. Passed by a vote of 307-97, the legislation will heighten warning-label requirements, prohibit …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

A Greek council of judges in Athens on Friday ordered two police officers to stand trial for the murder of 15-year-old Alexis Grigoropoulos that sparked violent protests in December. Officer Epameinonta Korkonea, who is accused of shooting Grigoropoulos, is charged with intentional murder, and Basil Saralioti is charged with complicity. The judges …

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by Christian Ehret

The Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina on Thursday sentenced a former Bosnian Serb army commander to 25 years imprisonment for ordering an attack that killed 71 and wounded 150. Novak Djukic was charged with war crimes against civilians under Article 173 of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Criminal Code for ordering his …

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by Christian Ehret

The Myanmar court conducting the trial of pro-democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi has delayed the proceedings for at least two weeks, according to Friday media reports. Suu Kyi's lawyers requested the delay to allow defense witness and legal expert Khin Moe Moe to testify and explain why the charges against the …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) on Thursday criticized Bermuda Premier Ewart Brown for failing to consult with London before agreeing to accept four Uighur Guantanamo detainees. Bermuda is a UK territory, and although it is self-governing, the UK remains responsible for matters of foreign policy and security. Bermuda considered accepting the …

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by Christian Ehret

The US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit ruled Thursday that the US government can continue to withhold photos of alleged detainee abuse while it awaits a response from the US Supreme Court. The appellate-level decision followed a recent Supreme Court order granting the government a 30-day extension to appeal a ruling …

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by Christian Ehret

The US Supreme Court on Thursday denied bail to Canadian-born media mogul Conrad Black, leaving him the option of filing a request in district court. The one-page denial was issued by Justice John Paul Stevens in response to Black's recent request for bail pending appeal. …

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by Benjamin Hackman

The government of Sri Lanka has failed for the past two decades to redress alleged human-rights violations such as torture, enforced disappearances, and extrajudicial killings, according to an Amnesty International (AI) report published Thursday. As early as 1991, the UN Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances had received more …

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by Matt Glenn

Of 113 terrorism cases in the Netherlands between September 11, 2001 and 2008, only 27 have led to convictions according to a report Thursday in the NRC Handelsblad. The report states that some of those convictions have been overturned on appeal. The conviction rate for terror crimes, which are prosecuted under the …

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by Matt Glenn

Many human rights abuses that occurred during the war in Kosovo have gone uninvestigated and unpunished, Amnesty International (AI), told Deutsche Welle Wednesday, which was the 10-year anniversary of the conflict's end. An AI report released earlier this week found that, as of April, nearly 2,000 people remain unaccounted …

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by Ximena Marinero

The Peruvian Congress voted Wednesday to suspend controversial land laws for 90 days, in an effort to quell indigenous protests that led to a violent clash last week when police attempted to disperse groups blocking access routes. Peruvian Prime Minister Yehude Simon [official profile, …

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