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Legal news from Thursday, June 11, 2009
by Christian Ehret

A South Korean court ruled Thursday that Microsoft violated antitrust regulations by packaging software with the Windows operating system, but dismissed requests for damages from two Korean software firms. The suit alleged that the company's packaging of MSN Messenger and Windows Media Player with their operating system caused financial damage to competitors Digito.com and …

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by Christian Ehret

The European Union Court of First Instance ruled Thursday that an EU-ordered asset freeze of a Jordanian terrorist suspect lacked judicial review, violating the suspect's fundamental rights. The assets of Muslim cleric Abu Qatada were frozen in 2001 pursuant to a UN Security Council resolution, which specified entities and persons who …

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by Christian Ehret

Kenya has until the end of August to establish a tribunal to try the leaders behind the 2007 post-election violence, former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan told the BBC Thursday. If the country does not meet the August deadline, which was originally set for March, Annan plans to give the International Criminal Court (ICC) [official …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

Four Uighurs held at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility have been released from US custody Thursday and transferred to Bermuda. The US Department of Justice (DOJ) reported that the four detainees had been cleared for release by the interagency Guantanamo Review Task Force and were transferred pursuant to an agreement with …

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by Christian Ehret

US authorities on Wednesday charged 24 individuals with looting Native American artifacts from public land. The accused are charged with violations of the Archaeological Resource Protection Act (ARPA) and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) in connection with the theft of 256 artifacts worth $335,685. The ARPA prohibits the …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

Palau President Johnson Toribiong told the Associated Press Thursday that his offer to accept 17 Uighur detainees held at Guantanamo Bay was motivated by human rights concerns and not by the Chinese government's reaction. The Palau government, which grants diplomatic recognition to Taiwan, not China, reportedly granted the US government's request to …

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by Christian Ehret

Chinese human rights lawyer Li Fangping has challenged a government mandate requiring Internet filter software on all new personal computers, according to media reports Thursday. Fangping demanded public hearings from the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) to determine if the requirement is lawful and reasonable. The software, called "Green Dam," blocks …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) ruled Wednesday that the Turkish government is responsible for the death of a woman at the hands of her ex-husband. The court found that in failing to prevent the woman's death, Turkey had violated her right to life under Article 2 of the European Convention on …

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by Devin Montgomery

The US House Judiciary Committee voted 29-0 Wednesday to approve four articles of impeachment against US district court judge Samuel Kent based on his conviction for obstruction of justice [18 USC § 1512(c)(2) text] in connection with the alleged sexual harassment of his secretary and former case manager. The …

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by Brian Jackson

Three US contractors arrested for the killing of another contractor will be released due to insufficient evidence against them, their lawyers said Wednesday. Two other men are still being held, but are expected to be released shortly. The five men were arrested and accused of stabbing Jim Kitterman inside the Baghdad Green Zone [GlobalSecurity …

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