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Legal news from Wednesday, January 14, 2009
by Leslie Schulman

Iraq has become the 186th nation to join the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) by acceding to the 1997 Chemical Weapons Convention, the organization announced Wednesday. A spokesperson for UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon praised Iraq's move, saying that it showed the Iraqi government's "commitment to disarmament and …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

A judge on the US District Court for the District of Columbia on Wednesday granted habeas to Guantanamo detainee Mohammed El Gharani and directed his release. El Gharani, a Chadian citizen born in Saudi Arabia, was arrested in Pakistan on suspicion of ties to al Qaeda. Judge Richard Leon [official profile; JURIST …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments Wednesday in two cases. In Puckett v. United States, the Court heard arguments on whether a defendant's claim, not raised at trial, that the prosecution breached a plea agreement is reviewable on appeal according to the plain-error standard under …

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by Ximena Marinero

A judge in the Penal Chamber of the National Court of Spain in Madrid on Tuesday ordered a trial for the men allegedly responsible for the killings of six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper, and her daughter. Judge Eloy Velasco admitted the plea entered in November …

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by Kayleigh Shebs

The convening authority of military commissions Susan Crawford has said that torture tactics were used in the interrogation of Mohammed al-Qahtani, a suspect held at Guantanamo Bay under allegations of connections to the 9/11 attacks, according to a Wednesday interview in the Washington Post. Crawford …

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by Ximena Marinero

Judge John Bates of the US District Court for the District of Columbia on Tuesday ordered that copies of the documents related to the investigation into the late 2006 firings of nine US attorneys be provided by the Bush administration to the incoming Obama administration. The court order indicated that …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The US Supreme Court decided two cases Wednesday. The Court ruled 5-4 in Herring v. United States that evidence seized during a search incident to an arrest does not have to be suppressed when the sole premise for the arrest was information later found to be negligently …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The Bush administration engaged in numerous abuses, and the incoming Obama administration should launch a criminal investigation to find out whether any laws were violated, according to a report released Tuesday by US House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Conyers, Jr. (D-MI). In the nearly 500-page report, Conyers points to allegations of …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The former acting head of the Civil Rights Division at the US Department of Justice (DOJ) routinely discriminated against job applicants and employees who did not share his conservative political views, according to a report released Tuesday. The report, dated July 2, 2008, was prepared by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) …

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by Andrew Morgan

International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) prosecutor Justice Hassan B. Jallow on Tuesday appealed the 15-year sentence given to popular Rwandan singer-songwriter Simon Bikindi. Jallow appealed the sentence on the grounds that it was inadequate punishment for "direct and public incitement to commit genocide." …

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