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Legal news from Wednesday, July 23, 2008
by Abigail Salisbury

Guantanamo detainee Salim Ahmed Hamdan walked out of the courtroom at his military commission trial on Wednesday, refusing to watch a video depicting one of his interrogation sessions. Hamdan's lawyers had sought to have his interrogations excluded from evidence, arguing that they violated his right against self-incrimination under the Fifth Amendment …

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by Devin Montgomery

The US House of Representatives on Wednesday passed the Foreclosure Prevention Act of 2008, a bill designed to address problems from the country's so-called "sub-prime mortgage collapse." The Act provides for government grants allowing municipalities to buy and redevelop foreclosed properties, and would allow the federal government to provide additional financial backing …

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by Deirdre Jurand

A Mexican woman pleaded guilty Tuesday in the US District Court for the Eastern District of New York to one count of sex trafficking for her role in recruiting Mexican women, sometimes by force, for prostitution in the US. Consuelo Carreto Valencia was extradited to the US in January 2007, and in March 2007 …

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by Mike Rosen-Molina

A three-judge panel from the British Court of Appeal on Wednesday denied the appeals of five men convicted on charges of conspiring to cause death and suffering through a plan to detonate bombs in a crowded area near London. Each of the men was sentenced to at least 35 years in prison after …

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by Devin Montgomery

US Attorney General Michael Mukasey announced  to the House Judiciary Committee  Wednesday that during his remaining time in office he will focus primarily on addressing the legal rights of US-held enemy combatants and ensuring that voting rights laws are adhered to in upcoming elections. He also …

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by Deirdre Jurand

Two members of the US House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce began an investigation Tuesday into whether the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allowed the continued sale of certain drugs that agency officials knew had been manufactured and sold using faulty data. The investigation began after the US Attorney for …

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by Mike Rosen-Molina

Iraqi President Jalal Talabani and the two other members of the Iraqi Presidency Council refused to sign a provincial election bill on Wednesday, noting that it had been passed by an incomplete parliament. Kurdish legislators boycotted a Tuesday vote on the bill in the Iraqi Parliament, objecting to an …

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by Mike Rosen-Molina

Italy will rework plans to fingerprint the country's Roma minority, altering requirements to only include those who do not have valid identification cards, the country's Interior Ministry announced Tuesday. The decision is seen as a concession to intense criticism of the fingerprinting plan by the international human rights community and Roma advocates …

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by Devin Montgomery

Sudan plans to create its own internationally-monitored courts to try war crimes suspects from the country's Darfur region, League of Arab States (LAS) official Hisham Yussef said on Tuesday. The International Criminal Court (ICC) in the Netherlands currently handles such proceedings, but if Sudanese domestic courts are created with appropriate …

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by Deirdre Jurand

A judge in the US District Court for the Southern District of New York ruled on Tuesday that the government must unseal most of the grand jury testimony from the Julius and Ethel Rosenberg espionage case. In January, George Washington University's National Security Archive petitioned the court [text, PDF; …

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by Deirdre Jurand

The Italian Senate on Wednesday announced that it has passed legislation granting Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi and other high-ranking officials immunity from prosecution while in office. Berlusconi's government proposed the legislation, which was passed in Italy's …

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by Nick Fiske

A three-judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit on Tuesday denied an emergency stay for a Mississippi death row inmate challenging the state's lethal injection procedure. The court found that Dale Leo Bishop failed to establish that he would suffer an irreparable injury if the stay of execution was not …

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by Nick Fiske

The US Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit on Tuesday affirmed a lower court's decision granting a permanent injunction against enforcement of the Child Online Protection Act (COPA), a federal law that imposes civil and criminal penalties on website operators for making sexually explicit materials available to minors over the …

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