A Collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh
advertisement
Legal news from Tuesday, May 27, 2008
by Andrew Gilmore

Russian authorities are wrongly indicting thousands of citizens every year, Russian Prosecutor-General Yury Chaika said Tuesday at a Moscow meeting held to discuss compensation for those falsely charged. Chaika said that in 2007, 5,265 people were eventually cleared after having charges wrongly laid against them. Critics have long slammed the Russian justice …

[read more]
by Andrew Gilmore

Zimbabwe will not return former Ethiopian dictator Mengistu Haile Mariam to Ethiopia to face a death sentence, a Zimbabwean Information Ministry official said Tuesday. The Ethiopian Supreme Court sentenced Mengistu to death in absentia on Monday after Ethiopian prosecutors appealed his January 2007 life sentence on charges of genocide, homicide, illegal imprisonment, …

[read more]
by Devin Montgomery

A Chilean judge Monday ordered the arrest of 98 people suspected of covering up over 100 kidnappings and murders during the 1973-1990 rule of former military dictator Augusto Pinochet. The court's investigation is focused on the regime's program of torturing and "disappearing" political dissidents, and those arrested include former members of the country's National …

[read more]
by Abigail Salisbury

The US Supreme Court handed down three decisions Tuesday, including two cases involving alleged employer retaliation. In Gomez-Perez v. Potter, the Court held 6-3 that a provision in the Age Discrimination in Employment Act protects government employees who complain of age discrimination from subsequent retaliation. The …

[read more]
by Allyson Amster

The five states that border the Arctic - Canada, Denmark, Norway, Russia and the US - will meet in Greenland Wednesday to discuss plans to divide harvesting rights to resources and minerals on the Arctic seabed. Under the Law of the Sea Treaty, a country has exclusive harvesting rights to a zone extending 200 nautical miles …

[read more]
by Mike Rosen-Molina

Former Peruvian general Rodolfo Robles testified Monday that he believed that former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori was responsible for two massacres that took place during his presidency in the early 1990s, but admitted that he did not have any evidence linking Fujimori to the deaths. He said that he had "absolute conviction" that Fujimori …

[read more]
by Mike Rosen-Molina

The ruling junta of Myanmar Tuesday extended the house arrest of democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi for another year, a decision that has angered and frustrated many in the international community. Suu Kyi's detention was set to expire at midnight Tuesday, although the military government was widely expected to issue the extension. The …

[read more]
by Devin Montgomery

Former Argentine general Luciano Benjamin Menendez and seven others went on trial Tuesday for the alleged 1977 kidnapping, torture, and killing of four political dissidents during the country's "Dirty War". The 80-year old Menendez, who commanded an army corps in the late 1970s, was originally taken into custody in 2005, when …

[read more]
by Devin Montgomery

Uganda has established a special court to hear cases of alleged war crimes and human rights abuses related to an ongoing rebellion in the country, a High Court judge said Monday. Uganda's government agreed to create the war crimes court in February during peace negotiations with the guerrilla Lord's Resistance Army …

[read more]

Latest Readers

@JURISTnews

Support JURIST

We rely on our readers to keep JURIST running

 Donate now!

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.