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Legal news from Friday, April 18, 2008
by Steve Czajkowski

Former Fannie Mae CEO Franklin Raines has agreed to pay $24.7 million to settle a civil lawsuit brought by the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight (OFHEO), OFHEO said Friday. In 2006, OFHEO filed the lawsuit against Raines, former Vice Chairman and CFO J. Timothy Howard, …

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by Eric Firkel

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is currently investigating 2,500 cases of public corruption, a 50 percent increase from five years ago, FBI Director Robert Mueller said in a Thursday speech to the American Bar Association. Mueller also said that corporate fraud cases had increased by more than 80 percent from five years ago, …

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by Steve Czajkowski

Protecting human rights is vital to bridging inequalities between countries, Pope Benedict XVI said Friday in a speech to the United Nations General Assembly in New York on the third day of his visit to the United States. The Pope said:Experience shows that legality often prevails over justice when the insistence upon rights makes …

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by Patrick Porter

European Commission ministers Friday agreed on implementation of a new counter-terrorism package, including a proposal to amend the Framework Decision on combating terrorism to criminalize recruitment and training for terrorism, particularly when committed through the Internet. Despite recent criticism by Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly (PACE) Rapporteur Dick Marty [personal website; …

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by Eric Firkel

Maine Gov. John Baldacci signed a bill into law late Thursday that would require an applicant to show proof of US residency before being issued a state driver's license or ID card. Forty-three other states already require proof of legal US residency to get a driver's license. The new law brings Maine closer to …

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by Patrick Porter

US Army Col. Lawrence Morris, chief prosecutor for the Guantanamo Bay military commissions, has said that the trials of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and other Sept. 11 suspects will be broadcast live via closed-circuit television to several military bases so that victims' families can watch, according to Friday media reports. Some family members applauded the …

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by Patrick Porter

Former Supreme Court of Pakistan justice Rana Bhagwandas Thursday told the Lahore High Court Bar Association that the Supreme Court as currently constituted is unconstitutional, and that its ruling supporting Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf's November 3 declaration of emergency rule is invalid. Bhagwandas said only a two-thirds majority by both …

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by Jaime Jansen

A judge in Zimbabwe on Friday dismissed an attempt by opposition candidate Morgan Tsvangirai and his Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) to block a partial recount of Zimbabwe's March 29 elections. Official election results have not yet been released, but independent tallies suggest that Tsvangirai won the presidential election and that the parliamentary …

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by Jaime Jansen

The US Senate voted 64-28 Thursday to direct the US Department of Justice (DOJ) to open an investigation into discrepancies between the 2005 Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act (SAFETEA-LU) as approved in Congress and the version that was sent to the president for signature. The 2005 highway spending bill contained more than …

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by Jaime Jansen

The Bush administration has asked the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit to set aside a decision by a federal judge sitting in Vermont that allowed Vermont to regulate automotive greenhouse gas emissions. In Green Mountain Plymouth Dodge Jeep v. Crombie, the US District Court for the District of Vermont held that the …

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by Jaime Jansen

The UN-backed International Criminal Court (ICC) swore in Silvana Arbia as new registrar in a ceremony at The Hague on Thursday, during which Arbia said that she intends to make protecting witnesses a priority as the ICC prepares for its first trial this year. Arbia was elected by the judges of the ICC …

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by Jaime Jansen

Canada requested in 2002 that the United States not send detainee Omar Khadr to Guantanamo Bay after his capture in Afghanistan, according to a letter submitted with court documents filed by Khadr's lawyers Thursday. Khadr's lawyers have argued that Guantanamo was an inappropriate place to detain Khadr because he was 15 …

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by Jaime Jansen

The US Department of Justice has opened an internal probe into whether DOJ lawyers acted improperly when advising the US Department of Defense in a 2003 memorandum that military interrogators could employ a wide range of interrogation methods when questioning foreign detainees outside the United States without fear of criminal liability or constitutional …

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