Canada finds no evidence of torture in Afghanistan detainee transfers

[JURIST] The Canadian Army [official website] Tuesday announced that independent investigators have found no evidence [press release] to support allegations [JURIST report] that the army "may have aided or abetted the torture of detainees" by transferring them from Canadian to Afghan custody. Amnesty International Canada [advocacy website] and the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association [advocacy website] brought complaints against the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal (CFPM) [official website] in February, alleging complicity by Canadian personnel serving in Afghanistan as part of the NATO International Security Assistance Force (ISAF). The investigation was conducted by two superintendents of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police [official website], as the Canadian Forces National Investigation Service [official website], which normally conducts such inquiries, is in the direct chain of command of the CFPM.

Scandal erupted in April when the Toronto Globe and Mail reported [text] that more than 30 terrorism suspects had been tortured by Afghan investigators after being transferred from Canadian custody. As a result of the public outcry, Canada signed a new agreement regarding detainee transfers [JURIST report] with the Afghan government, giving Canada the right to inspect detainees following their transfer. A separate investigation regarding detainee abuse while in Canadian custody is ongoing [JURIST report]. Canadian Press has more.

 

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