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Legal news from Friday, July 27, 2007
by Mike Rosen-Molina

An Indian court Friday sentenced to death Yakub Memon, the brother of a man suspected of plotting the 1993 Mumbai bombings [BBC backgrounder, for his role in the attack that killed 257 people and injured more than 700 in India's financial center. Memon's brother Tiger Memon remains at large. Another brother, Essa Memon, received a life sentence …

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by Mike Rosen-Molina

The US Congress sent an anti-terror bill to President George Bush for signature Friday. The bill, based on recommendations by the 9/11 commission, would transfer funds to states and cities found to be at high risk for terrorist attacks. It also includes a provision to screen all air and sea cargo coming …

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by Mike Rosen-Molina

Taiwanese Foreign Minister James Huang said Friday that a national referendum on Taiwan's membership in the United Nations would proceed despite opposition from China. On Monday, the United Nations Office of Legal Affairs rejected Taiwan's fifteenth bid for member state status, reiterating the One-China Policy and recognizing the People's Republic of China (PRC) [JURIST news …

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by Mike Rosen-Molina

The government of Sudan said Thursday that it will appeal a US court verdict ordering it to pay $7.96 million in compensation to the families of 17 US Navy personnel killed in the 2000 al Qaeda attack on the USS Cole. Sudanese Justice Minister Mohammed Ali al-Mardi denied that Sudan …

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by Michael Sung

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Thursday that UN officials will not testify before the East Timorese-Indonesian Commission of Truth and Friendship (CTF) because the CTF's terms of reference allow for the possibility of amnesty for the perpetrators of crimes against humanity. Ban, who reiterated the recommendations in the Report of the Secretary-General …

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by Michael Sung

The UN Human Rights Committee Friday urged the Sudanese government to "take all appropriate measures" to guarantee that all state agents, including the military and armed militias, discontinue "widespread and systematic" violations of human rights. The recommendations, presented in the panel's concluding observations, also call on the Sudanese government to end immunities in Sudanese law …

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by Michael Sung

US District Judge Edward Nottingham Friday sentenced former Qwest Communications CEO Joseph Nacchio to six years in prison and ordered him to pay the maximum $19 million fine and forfeit of $52 million in assets obtained through insider trading. Nacchio, who was convicted of 19 counts of insider trading in …

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by Michael Sung

The European Commission (EC) confirmed Friday that its Directorate General for Competition has sent a Statement of Objections (SO) to semiconductor manufacturing giant Intel, notifying the company that the EC believes it has abused its dominant position in the x86 architecture processor market to exclude its biggest rival Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) [corporate …

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by Michael Sung

French magistrates have filed preliminary charges of "complicity in slanderous denunciations" against former French Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin, Villepin's lawyer said Friday. Villepin is accused of ordering a smear campaign against former political rival and current French President Nicolas Sarkozy as well as being responsible for …

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by Michael Sung

The United States and the European Union Thursday signed an agreement on the regulation of trans-Atlantic airline passenger data-sharing, allowing the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to continue using passenger data when the existing interim agreement expires at the end of July. Under the …

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by Michael Sung

A Nigerian court sentenced former state governor Dieprieye Alamieyeseigha Thursday to a total of 12 years in prison after Alamieyeseigha pleaded guilty to six counts of corruption and money laundering. Alamieyeseigha, who governed the oil-rich Bayelsa state from 1999 to 2005, has spent almost two years in custody. He will be eligible for release soon …

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by Michael Sung

US President George W. Bush signed the Foreign Investment and National Security Act of 2007 Thursday, expanding the investigative scope of the Treasury Department's Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) to include foreign investments in vital infrastructure and energy and adding an additional 45-day review …

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by Michael Sung

Australian Director of Public Prosecutions Damian Bugg ordered the dismissal of a terror charge against Dr. Mohammad Haneef Friday. Bugg said that after personally reviewing all materials in the case, there was insufficient evidence to establish that Haneef had recklessly provided material support to terrorists by leaving a …

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by Michael Sung

Former South Africa President F.W. de Klerk on Thursday denied having knowledge of or participating in crimes against opposition members while he was in office during the apartheid era, adding that South Africa should "look at the future" and refrain from engaging "persecution and retribution." De Clerk, who has refused to apply for amnesty …

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by Michael Sung

FBI Director Robert Mueller on Thursday contradicted testimony given by US Attorney General Alberto Gonzales earlier this week concerning a 2004 discussion of intelligence activities. Mueller testified before the House Judiciary Committee Thursday that there was dissent within the administration concerning the National Security Agency's domestic surveillance program expressed during the meeting, but Gonzales …

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