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Legal news from Monday, June 25, 2007
by Leslie Schulman

Google is urging the US government, including the Departments of State and Commerce, the Office of the US Trade Representative, and various House and Senate committees, to fight the rise of global Internet censorship, according to Monday reports. Google's Director of Public Policy and Government Affairs Andrew McLaughlin said in …

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by Leslie Schulman

The government of Canada, currently investigating whether detainees in Afghanistan were abused while in Canadian custody, will not make inquiries into allegations of torture or abuse after the detainees were transferred to Afghan officials, according to Monday reports. Lieutenant-Commander Philip Anido, a spokesman for the board of inquiry in charge of the …

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by Gabriel Haboubi

Portuguese Prime Minister José Sócrates said Monday that Portugal - which takes over the rotating EU presidency from Germany in July - would work to have negotiations pursuant to Saturday's landmark agreement on an EU reform treaty finalized by October. Portugal's Permanent Representative to the European Union, Alvaro Mendonca, told the Centre for …

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by Gabriel Haboubi

German prosecutors said Monday they will seek the extradition of 13 US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) agents they believe to be responsible for the alleged 2003 kidnapping and extraordinary rendition of German national Khalid El-Masri. US State Department Deputy Spokesman Tom Casey said that he hadn't formally heard about …

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by Michael Sung

Iranian 2003 Nobel Peace Prize laureate and human rights lawyer Shirin Ebadi Monday accused the Iranian government of interfering in judicial affairs to prevent the release of two US clients currently detained by Iranian authorities. In a letter to Iranian Judiciary head Seyyed Mahmoud Hashemi Shahroudi, Ebadi said the government …

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by Gabriel Haboubi

The US Supreme Court granted certiorari Monday in four cases to be heard next term. In Riegel v. Medtronic (06-179) [docket; cert. petition] the court will decide whether Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation of medical devices protects manufacturers, such as Medtronic, Inc., from state product liability …

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by Michael Sung

The Supreme Court of the Russian Federation has upheld a 2006 Moscow ban on gay pride parades, dismissing an appeal by parade organizers. The decision handed down Friday upheld a Moscow City Court ruling in May of last year finding that a city ban was legal under Russian law and the …

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by Gabriel Haboubi

A court in Tel Aviv ruled Monday on an appeal by Omri Sharon, reducing his prison sentence for corruption from nine to seven months. Sharon, son of former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, pleaded guilty in 2005 to charges of campaign finance violations that included falsifying corporate documents and lying under oath. …

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by Michael Sung

China's National People's Congress on Sunday revised a proposed law regulating media during national emergencies after delegates and local people's congresses criticized the law as improper. The proposal, first introduced last June, would have imposed fines up to $13,000 on media outlets that report on public emergencies such as floods or disease outbreaks without formal …

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by Jeannie Shawl

The US Supreme Court handed down decisions in five cases Monday, including Morse v. Frederick, where the Court held that public schools do not violate the First Amendment rights of students by sanctioning them for speech during a school-sanctioned activity that may be reasonably interpreted to promote the …

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by Michael Sung

The US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) Monday declassified a 693-page file detailing the CIA's illegal activities compiled from a comprehensive internal investigation initiated in May, 1973 by then-CIA director James R. Schlesinger following the Watergate scandal. The probe revealed multiple instances of possible illegal detention, burglary, domestic surveillance of American …

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by Bernard Hibbitts

Russian Deputy Prosecutor General Ivan Sydoruk has said that the country should police Internet sites to prevent the spread of extremist material, according to the newspaper Kommersant Friday. Extremism has recently been a major concern for Russian politicians due to deadly attacks on dark-skinned foreigners. Last year, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a …

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by Michael Sung

China's National People's Congress Sunday began considering measures to codify legal ethics, improve criminal suspects' access to defense lawyers and evidence, and allowed experienced lawyers to establish individual private law firms. The reforms, which guarantee lawyers the right to meet defendants in all cases with the exception of those involving state secrets, were proposed by the Ministry …

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by Michael Sung

An Egyptian state security court convicted Muhammad Sayed Saber of spying for Israel's Institute for Intelligence and Special Operations (Mossad) Monday and sentenced the former Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency employee to life in prison. Two foreign nationals, Brian Peter of Ireland and Shiro Izo of Japan, were convicted in absentia and also sentenced to life …

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by Michael Sung

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor continued his boycott Monday of the judicial proceedings against him during the second day of his trial at the UN-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL). Taylor is demanding that the court either allow him to represent himself or obtain a British Queen's Counsel. Taylor …

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