A Collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh
advertisement
Legal news from Wednesday, May 9, 2007
by Mike Rosen-Molina

The Egyptian Parliament Wednesday deprived two Muslim Brotherhood lawmakers of their official immunity. Under Egyptian law, legislators enjoy immunity from prosecution unless the parliament votes to remove it. Sabri Amer and Ragab Abu Zeid were the first Brotherhood members to lose immunity since the 2005 election; Zeid labeled the decision as a government-orchestrated …

[read more]
by Mike Rosen-Molina

A US Marine sergeant testified Wednesday at the Article 32 hearing of Marine lawyer Capt. Randy W. Stone that Stone and other supervisors repeatedly ignored his requests to launch an investigation into the killings of 24 Iraqi civilians at Haditha. 1st Sergeant Albert Espinosa, who was responsible for the casualty reports of …

[read more]
by Mike Rosen-Molina

The Supreme Court of Pakistan Wednesday blocked all media coverage of the proceedings against suspended Chief Justice Iftikar Chaudhry and ordered an end to television and newspaper commentary that could "interfere" with the legal process. In a statement, the court said: Discussions, comments or write-ups which are likely to interfere with the …

[read more]
by Michael Sung

The Supreme Court of Japan Wednesday dismissed two cases filed by Chinese nationals seeking compensation for Japan's use of biological weapons and the Nanjing Massacre during the Second Sino-Japanese War between 1937 and 1945. The high court upheld previous decisions by the Tokyo District Court and the Tokyo High Court which …

[read more]
by Mike Rosen-Molina

Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski signed two gay rights bills into law Wednesday, establishing civil unions for gay couples and enacting anti-discrimination measures. House Bill 2007 allows same-sex couples to enter into contractual domestic partnerships with the same state benefits as married couples. The measure covers state benefits including inheritance, child custody, and hospital visitation …

[read more]
by Michael Sung

An Alabama grand jury issued a sealed indictment Wednesday in the 1965 shooting and death of 26-year-old Jimmie Lee Jackson by state trooper James Bonard Fowler during an attempt by state troopers to disperse a protest against the jailing of a civil rights worker. The indictment, which will remain sealed until it is served, is expected to …

[read more]
by Michael Sung

The Iraqi Council of Representatives Wednesday approved a measure to take legal action against Al Jazeera television for alleged insults against top Shiite cleric Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani. The measure followed days of protests by thousands of Shi'a Muslims in the southern cities of Basra and Najaf …

[read more]
by Mike Rosen-Molina

Oklahoma Governor Brad Henry Tuesday reluctantly signed a strict immigration reform bill meant to discourage illegal immigration. The Oklahoma Taxpayer and Citizen Protection Act of 2007 denies illegal immigrants state identification, and requires all state and local agencies to verify citizenship status of applicants before authorizing benefits. The law also require public employers …

[read more]
by Michael Sung

A Zimbabwe court ruled Wednesday that British national Simon Mann could be extradited to Equatorial Guinea to face charges of plotting a coup against Equatorial Guinea President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo. Mann's defense team had argued against Mann's extradition on the grounds that he is likely to face torture and possible death …

[read more]
by Brett Murphy

A UK court found two men guilty of violating Section 3 of Britain's Official Secrets Act by leaking a secret memo in which President Bush was said to have told UK Prime Minister Tony Blair in April 2004 of a plan to bomb Arab broadcaster Al Jazeera at the height of the US campaign …

[read more]
by Brett Murphy

The new UK Ministry of Justice began operations Wednesday, as a controversial split of the traditional Home Office that is setting the British government against the judiciary went into effect. Lord Falconer of Thoroton, serving as the first Secretary of State for Justice, said that the new focus of the Justice …

[read more]
by Brett Murphy

The appeals chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) reduced the sentence of former Bratunac brigade commander Vidoje Blagojevic from 18 to 15 years for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre. The court reversed Blagojevic's conviction on charges of …

[read more]
by Leslie Schulman

Three US lawmakers introduced legislation Tuesday to close the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, calling the prison a symbol of US failure and hypocrisy. Rep. Jane Harman (D-CA) announced the legislation with a statement Tuesday, asserting:Guantanamo has become a liability. The real and perceived injustices occurring there …

[read more]
by Brett Murphy

A federal judge dismissed the indictment against anti-Castro militant Luis Posada Carriles on Tuesday, holding that the government purposefully manipulated Carriles' statement in order to charge him with lying to immigration authorities. The government alleged that Carriles confessed to illegally crossing the Mexican border, but US District Judge Kathleen Cardone …

[read more]
by Brett Murphy

The US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit Tuesday denied a request by the city government of Washington, DC for an en banc rehearing of the court's March decision invalidating the city's handgun ban. DC Mayor Adrian Fenty expressed disappointment with the decision, saying that "The District's gun control laws have been a …

[read more]
by Leslie Schulman

With Serbia poised to assume the rotating presidency of the Council of Europe this week, several human rights groups have spoken out against the country's new role, asserting that a country in violation of the 1948 Genocide Convention should not be allowed to lead the European human rights watchdog. In February, the International Court of Justice …

[read more]
by Brett Murphy

The Administrative Court in Egypt ruled Tuesday that a presidential order that forty top members of the Muslim Brotherhood be tried before a military court was invalid, holding that the members must be tried instead in civilian court. According to a statement from the Muslim Brotherhood, the decision was a "historic …

[read more]
by Brett Murphy

Jury selection concluded Tuesday in the terrorism trial of Jose Padilla and two co-defendants. Prosecutors have accused the defense of trying to exclude all white and Hispanic men from the jury, while the defense accused prosecutors of excluding any person with ties to Islam. US District Judge Marcia Cooke, however, determined that neither side …

[read more]
by Leslie Schulman

Tennessee executed its first death row inmate Wednesday after a moratorium on executions imposed by the governor in February expired earlier this month. Philip Workman's execution had been postponed five times, and last minute appeals by his lawyers arguing that lethal injection constitutes cruel and unusual punishment and that the state's …

[read more]
by Brett Murphy

Scotland Yard arrested four suspects in London on Wednesday in connection with the London transit bombings on July 7, 2005 that left 52 people dead. Police arrested Mohammed Sidique Khan, Mohammed Shakil, Sadeer Saleem, and Waheed Ali on suspicion of the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism …

[read more]
by Brett Murphy

Russian officials have harassed human rights defense lawyer Karinna Moskalenko and are attempting to disbar her after Moskalenko filed complaints with the European Court of Human Rights over alleged rights violations by the Russian government, the International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights said Tuesday. IHF is asking Russian authorities to end the harassment. IHF Executive …

[read more]
by Brett Murphy

The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) said Tuesday that it will continue to move forward with implementation of the REAL ID Act, despite opposition among state legislatures and in the US Senate. The Senate Judiciary Committee met on Tuesday to hear testimony on privacy and civil liberties Concerns with …

[read more]
by Jeannie Shawl

Jury selection is expected to begin Wednesday in the court-martial of US Navy Lt. Cmdr. Matthew M. Diaz, charged under the Uniform Code of Military Justice and the Espionage Act with leaking secret national defense information to a person outside the government in connection with allegedly passing then-undisclosed names of Guantanamo detainees …

[read more]

Latest Readers

@JURISTnews

Support JURIST

We rely on our readers to keep JURIST running

 Donate now!

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.