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Legal news from Saturday, April 21, 2007
by Natalie Hrubos

A French appeals court Saturday acquitted one of 12 individuals who appealed their convictions in a 2005 child prostitution case, one of the biggest criminal trials in the country's history. Sixty-two men and women were initially convicted for offering forty-five children, ranging in age from six months to fifteen years, for sex from 1999 to …

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by Natalie Hrubos

The Shiite head of Iraq's Debaathification Commission said Friday he would fight a proposed law allowing former Baath party members to return to their previously held government positions. Despite provisions in the proposal that would prevent reemployment of former Baathists who have been charged with, or are sought for, criminal activities, Shiite leaders …

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by Natalie Hrubos

The US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held late this week that Arizona may enforce its voter identification law while a non-profit organization challenges the law in federal court. The law, which Arizonans approved in 2004 as Proposition 200, requires voters to show a government-issued ID [AZ Sec. of State materials; …

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by Michael Sung

A lawyer representing the Venezuelan government said Friday that Venezuela plans to press the United States on its refusal to prosecute or extradite Cuban anti-Castro militant and Venezuelan national Luis Posada Carriles on charges that Carriles orchestrated the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner. Venezuela plans to raise the issue before the …

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by Michael Sung

Jorge Acosta, president of Ecuador's Supreme Electoral Tribunal confirmed Friday that in a referendum last Sunday an overwhelming majority of voters approved the convening of a constitutional assembly to rewrite the country's constitution. Acosta said 81.72 percent of voters approved the measure and 12.43 percent voted against; 5.85 percent of …

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by Michael Sung

Virgina Tech shooting gunman Seung-Hui Cho was technically prohibited from purchasing firearms after a Virginia court found Cho to be an "imminent danger to himself" in December 2005 and issued an order for Cho to receive psychiatric treatment, the New York Times reported Friday. Under federal law [18 USC 922 (g)(4), text], persons "who have been adjudicated as …

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