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Legal news from Tuesday, April 3, 2007
by Joe Shaulis

New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson (D) on Tuesday unexpectedly vetoed a bill that would have required girls to be vaccinated against a sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer. AP reported that Richardson, who last month announced his intention to sign the bill, said the legislation's June 15 enactment date would not have …

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by Alexis Unkovic

Dhiren Barot, a British man who pleaded guilty in October to planning a series of bombs on US and British targets, filed an appeal in London’s Court of Appeal Criminal Division Tuesday. Barot was sentenced to life in prison in November after pleading guilty to conspiracy to murder for his role …

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by Ryan Olden

The anti-Syrian majority in the Lebanon parliament on Tuesday approved a petition asking UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to create a tribunal to investigate the assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik al-Hariri. Members of the parliamentary majority say that Syria was responsible for the assassination and that its allies …

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by Joe Shaulis

President Bush urged Congress on Tuesday to adopt his proposed targets for alternative fuel use as a way of combating greenhouse gas emissions a day after the US Supreme Court ruled in Massachusetts v. EPA that the Clean Air Act gives the …

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by Alexis Unkovic

US District Judge William Alsup of the Northern District of California approved the release Tuesday of jailed video journalist and blogger Josh Wolf, who was imprisoned for 226 days, longer than any other journalist, for refusing to testify before a grand jury. The judge agreed to Wolf's release after he complied with a …

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by Ryan Olden

United States intelligence agents from the FBI and the CIA have been using secret prisons in Ethiopia to conduct interrogations, according to AP Tuesday. The report alleges that men, women, and children from the neighboring African nations of Somalia and Kenya have been …

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by Lisl Brunner

A meeting to sort out remaining differences over the rules governing the Khmer Rouge genocide tribunal in Cambodia has been delayed after the Cambodian Bar Association (BAKC) refused to compromise on fees for foreign lawyers. The Bar Association has demanded that foreign defense counsel pay $4,900 to participate in the first year of …

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by Lisl Brunner

A court of appeals in Thailand Tuesday refused to extradite dissident Ly Tong to Vietnam for using a hijacked plane to drop anti-communist leaflets over Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon) in 2000. The court overturned a September ruling that ordered Tong's extradition to face criminal charges of slandering the Vietnamese …

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by Lisl Brunner

US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Tuesday announced the arrests of three former South American military officials suspected of war atrocities in their home countries. Ernesto Guillermo Barreiro is a former Argentine military officer accused of having served as the chief interrogator at La Perla, a clandestine prison during Argentina's 1976-83 Dirty War …

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by Holly Manges Jones

The Appeals Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) Tuesday slightly reduced the 32-year sentence of former Bosnian Serb leader Radislav Brdjanin, but upheld the majority of his 2004 convictions for crimes against Croats and Muslims during the Bosnian War. Brdjanin's …

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by Brett Murphy

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adopted new privacy rules for telephone and wireless companies on Tuesday aimed at strengthening safeguards against pretexting, the disclosure of personal telephone records to unauthorized individuals. The new rules include carrier authentication requirements, additional notice requirements, and annual certification requirements. Commenting on the …

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by Holly Manges Jones

The Nigerian Court of Appeal ruled Tuesday that the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) has the right to disqualify presidential candidates for fraud, thus barring Nigerian Vice President Atiku Abubakar from running in the April 21 election. INEC removed Abubakar's name from the ballot because he was indicted on corruption charges [JURIST …

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by Brett Murphy

Australian Attorney General Philip Ruddock said Tuesday that the gag order placed on Guantanamo Bay detainee David Hicks as part of his plea agreement cannot be enforced once he returns to Australia, and that Hicks could not be extradited if he were to violate the order. Lawyers for Hicks said that …

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by Holly Manges Jones

Taiwanese Nationalist Party (KMT) leader Ma Ying-jeou pleaded not guilty Tuesday to corruption charges and said he plans to run in the 2008 presidential elections no matter what the court's verdict. The charges against Ma stem from $333,000 that he transferred from a city expense fund to …

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by Jeannie Shawl

Ukrainian Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and leaders of the Ukrainian Parliament filed a lawsuit Tuesday seeking to block a decree from Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko to dissolve parliament and hold elections in May. Yushchenko issued the decree Monday, saying that his "actions are dictated by the crucial necessity to save the country's …

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by Holly Manges Jones

Thousands of protesters rallied outside the Pakistan Supreme Court Tuesday wearing signs and shouting chants against Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf for suspending the country's chief justice last month as a hearing regarding the suspension took place inside the court. Chief Justice Iftikhar Chaudhry was removed from his post by …

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by Holly Manges Jones

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick has directed the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to register the same-sex marriages of 26 couples from outside the state whose licenses were not previously allowed to be included in state records by former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. The couples were married in 2004 in four …

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by Holly Manges Jones

The European Commission is investigating Apple's iTunes to determine if sales restrictions based on the buyer's country of residence violate EU antitrust laws, according to a commission statement confirming the probe Tuesday. Music buyers in Europe are currently only able to download songs or albums from the iTunes store in their own …

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