Former CIA director denies use of torture in interrogations

[JURIST] Former CIA director George Tenet [BBC profile; Wikipedia profile] repeatedly denied that torture has been used during interrogations of terror suspects in an interview [text; recorded video part 1 and part 2] with CBS' 60 Minutes that aired Sunday. Tenet said that no one has ever died as a result of interrogation sessions and responded that he does not "talk about techniques" when asked if waterboarding [JURIST report; Wikipedia backgrounder] was ever used during questioning. Tenet did admit to "enhanced interrogation" methods, saying such methods were necessary after the Sept. 11 attacks [JURIST news archive]. Tenet reiterated that torture was not being used, however, despite acknowledging that he has never actually attended such interrogation sessions.

Tenet resigned [JURIST report] from his position at the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) [official website] in 2004 after increasing criticism that intelligence failures allowed the Sept. 11 attacks to occur. AFP has more.

 

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