A Collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh
advertisement
Legal news from Thursday, March 8, 2007
by Mike Rosen-Molina

Two Albany, New York men convicted in a money laundering scheme set up as an FBI sting were each sentenced Thursday to 15 years in prison. Former imam at Masjid as-Salam mosque Yassin Aref and mosque co-founder and pizzeria owner Mohammed Hossain were convicted in October for their roles in a money laundering scheme involving …

[read more]
by Jeannie Shawl

The Sudanese trial of Ali Kushayb, one of the two suspects accused by the International Criminal Court (ICC) of committing war crimes in Sudan's Darfur region, and two other security officials has been delayed after Kushayb filed an appeal in the case, Sudanese court officials said Thursday. Kushayb, Hamdi Sharafeddin and Abdel Rahman Daoud Hamida were …

[read more]
by Lisl Brunner

A new law to protect private property in China was presented to the Chinese legislature on Thursday. The law, in the making since 1993, would define the scope of public and private property to advance the developing socialist market economy, according to its proponents. In his speech to the fifth session of the Tenth National …

[read more]
by Lisl Brunner

The Disability Law Center of Massachusetts filed a lawsuit against the Massachusetts Department of Correction (DOC) on Thursday, saying the state's treatment of mentally ill prisoners violates the Constitution and the Americans with Disabilities Act. According to the suit filed in the US District Court for the District of Massachusetts, the state …

[read more]
by Mike Rosen-Molina

The CIA operated a secret interrogation and short-term detention facility for suspected terrorists from 2002 to 2004 in a Polish intelligence training school with the explicit approval of British and US authorities, according to a Raw Story investigative report. British and Polish intelligence officials familiar with the story placed the facility in a Soviet-era military compound [Wikipedia …

[read more]
by Lisl Brunner

Police surrounded the Congress of Ecuador on Thursday following a decision by the country's highest electoral court to dismiss 57 of its 100 lawmakers. In a questionable exercise of authority, the Supreme Electoral Tribunal ruled that the congressmen had illegally interfered with a referendum pushed by President Rafael Correa …

[read more]
by Mike Rosen-Molina

A Nigerian court held Wednesday that Vice President Atiku Abubakar can run in next month's presidential election, throwing out a decision by the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) to ban Abubakar after he was indicted for corruption. Only the court has the authority to ban a candidate from contesting elections under the …

[read more]
by Mike Rosen-Molina

The Bangladeshi interim government arrested six politicians, including the son of former prime minister Khaleda Zia, for alleged corruption Thursday, according to local media. Tarique Rahman was detained at his mother's house in Dhaka. Rahman, a senior member in the Bangladesh Nationalist Party, was widely expected to succeed his mother, …

[read more]
by Mike Rosen-Molina

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said his government will fully cooperate with an investigation by ruling Liberal Democratic party lawmakers into allegations that the Japanese military forced women into prostitution in army-operated brothels during World War II. Despite widespread evidence to the contrary, Japanese politicians have repeatedly denied the use of …

[read more]
by Gabriel Haboubi

Canadian Guantanamo detainee Omar Khadr told his mother Wednesday in the first phone call with his family since his capture in 2002 that he plans to do whatever he can to avoid appearing in front of his military trial in Guantanamo Bay because he believes the military commission [JURIST news …

[read more]
by Jeannie Shawl

The US Senate voted 51-48 Wednesday to adopt an amendment to a new anti-terror bill [S.4 summary], weakening union rights that would be granted to Transportation Security Administration (TSA) airport screeners under the bill. President Bush said last month that he would veto the anti-terror bill if provisions allowing TSA screeners to …

[read more]
by Gabriel Haboubi

The European Court of Human Rights held a hearing Thursday to determine the admissibility and merits of a case filed in 2003 by 159 children of Norwegian mothers and German fathers born during World War II. Many of these "war children" or "krigsbarn", were officially registered as children of "Lebensborn", a Nazi plot …

[read more]
by Gabriel Haboubi

China accused the US of numerous human rights abuses on Thursday in its Human Rights Record of the US in 2006, the Chinese state response to US criticism in Tuesday's publication of the 2006 US State Department Country Reports. The Chinese report, its eighth consecutive annual rebuttal to the …

[read more]
by Jeannie Shawl

The UK House of Commons backed two different proposals Wednesday on reforming the upper house of parliament [BBC Q/A], the House of Lords. Members of the House of Lords currently are appointed or hold hereditary peerages, but under the proposals at least 80 percent of members would be elected. Under the first plan …

[read more]
by Jeannie Shawl

Australian Guantanamo Bay detainee David Hicks will be arraigned before a US military commission on March 20, marking his first commission appearance after over five years in US detention. Australian Prime Minister John Howard confirmed the March 20 hearing in an interview with Southern Cross Broadcasting Thursday, expressing frustration at delays in bringing Hicks …

[read more]

Latest Readers

@JURISTnews

Support JURIST

We rely on our readers to keep JURIST running

 Donate now!

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.