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Legal news from Wednesday, March 7, 2007
by Mike Rosen-Molina

The French Constitutional Council has upheld a law banning anyone other than professional reporters from filming or broadcasting acts of violence. Violators would face up to five years in prison and a fine of €75,000 (US$98,537). French lawmakers say the ban, proposed by Minister of the Interior Nicolas Sarkozy, will …

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by Ryan Olden

A Turkish court Wednesday ordered telecom providers in the country to block access to YouTube because of videos insulting the founder of modern Turkey, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. The controversial videos have caused an uproar among Turks and led to prosecutors recommending the website be banned. During the past week, the country's media has been …

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by Ryan Olden

British Muslim Abdul Muhid was convicted in London Wednesday of two counts of inciting murder at a protest outside outside the Danish embassy in London last year. Muhid and associate Anjem Choudary were charged last May in connection with a February demonstration protesting the publication of cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in …

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by Ryan Olden

A court in East Timor Wednesday found former Interior Minister Rogerio Lobato guilty of promoting violence during the military riots in the country last year. The three judges hearing the case sentenced Lobato to seven-and-a-half years in prison for arming the militias that ravaged the country in April 2006. He was also found guilty …

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by Mike Rosen-Molina

Judges appointed to the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) have begun a 10-day meeting to craft an agreement on judicial rules to govern the anticipated Khmer Rouge genocide trials. The UN-backed ECCC, which cannot begin proceedings until the rules are agreed upon, urged the nine-judge panel to come …

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by Mike Rosen-Molina

The Uganda Law Society (ULS) announced Tuesday that lawyers would initiate a three-day strike as a protest against government interference with judicial independence. Uganda's judges are currently on a week-long strike following last week's siege of the nation's High Court by security forces. The lawyer strike is set to begin once judges reopen the courts. …

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by Gabriel Haboubi

The US State Department announced Tuesday that once again the United States will not run for a seat on the Geneva-based UN Human Rights Council. The US said last year that it would not seek election because some of the other countries vying for council seats …

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by Mike Rosen-Molina

The North Carolina State Department of Corrections filed a lawsuit against the North Carolina Medical Board Tuesday, alleging that recent policy changes preventing doctors' participation in lethal injections prevent the corrections department from carrying out executions. Under North Carolina law, a doctor must be present at all executions and changes made to lethal injection procedures …

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by Gabriel Haboubi

Italian patient's rights group Associazione Lucacoscioni said Tuesday that prosecutors have cleared anesthesiologist Dr. Mario Riccio, the physician being investigated for assisting in the December death of paralyzed right-to-die advocate Piergiorgio Welby. Shortly after Welby's death, several conservative Italian lawmakers had called for Riccio's arrest, …

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by Gabriel Haboubi

Reporters will not be allowed to attend hearings that will determine if the 14 "high-value" terror suspects who were transferred to Guantanamo Bay from secret CIA prisons last September are "enemy combatants," Defense Department officials announced Tuesday. This will be the first time that Combatant Status Review Tribunal …

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by Jeannie Shawl

Native American plaintiffs in the decade-old Indian Trust case [Cobell v. Norton litigation website] have rejected a new $7 billion settlement proposal from the US government but the chairman of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee nonetheless says he will hold a hearing later this month to provide administration officials, plaintiffs, and representatives from other interested parties an …

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by Jeannie Shawl

The US Department of Defense announced Tuesday that Deputy Secretary of Defense Gordon England has concluded that 55 Guantanamo Bay detainees are eligible for transfer after reviewing the results of a second round of administrative review board (ARB) hearings held at the US military prison between January 30, 2006 and December 6, 2006. …

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