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Legal news from Monday, January 15, 2007
by Leslie Schulman

The Constitutional Court of the German state of Bavaria Monday upheld a 2004 state law which bans teachers from wearing religious headscarves. An Islamic religious group had sued the state claiming the law was unconstitutional under the Bavarian state constitution because it eliminated Muslim symbols …

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by Leslie Schulman

Former Burundi President Domitien Ndayizeye and four others were acquitted by the Supreme Court of Burundi Monday on charges of attempting a coup and planning to assassinate current President Pierre Nkurunziza. Two other accused, Alain Mugabarabona and Tharcisse Ndayishimiye, were convicted and sentenced to jail on similar charges. Mugabarabona, the leader …

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by Alexis Unkovic

The United States observed a federal holiday Monday in honor of slain civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., remembered for his leadership of the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. Courts, government offices, and many public universities were closed as tributes to King were held throughout the country.Monday's commemoration …

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by Alexis Unkovic

The House of Representatives in Nepal adopted the country's draft interim constitution Monday following its approval by the Nepalese cabinet on Sunday. The interim constitution simultaneously provides for the dissolution of the current House of Representatives and the creation of an interim parliament which will include twenty-five percent of …

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by Alexis Unkovic

New rules intended to combat illegal immigration went into force in Russia Monday. The rules set harsher penalties for businesses that employ illegal migrants, restrict border crossings, amend the Criminal Code, limit the duration of visas distributed to certain nationalities, and increase reporting requirements to the Russian Federal …

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by Holly Manges Jones

A Moroccan editor and journalist were both convicted Monday of insulting the Islamic religion in a 10-page article about religious jokes published in a Moroccan newspaper in early December. Journalist Sanaa al-Aji and Driss Ksikes, editor of Nichane weekly, were given suspended sentences of three years, fined $9,280 each, and are prohibited from …

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by Bernard Hibbitts

Former Saddam-era Revolutionary Court judge Awad Hamed al-Bandar and former Iraqi intelligence chief Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikriti, sentenced to death with Saddam Hussein in November in connection with crimes against humanity committed in the town of Dujail in 1982, were executed before dawn Monday at an Iraqi military facility in Baghdad. As …

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by Alexis Unkovic

Kyrgyz President Kurmanbek Bakiyev approved several new amendments to the country's new constitution Monday, returning key powers to the presidency, including the right to appoint cabinet officials. The new constitutional amendments pushed through parliament at his urging contradict the aims of a compromise reached in November which led to the adoption …

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by Holly Manges Jones

US Vice President Dick Cheney Sunday defended the Pentagon and CIA's review of banking and credit records of hundreds of American citizens suspected of ties to terror groups, calling it a "perfectly legitimate activity" in an interview with Fox News Sunday. Cheney said the authority of the US Department of Defense to …

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by Holly Manges Jones

An Italian judge has thrown out some tax fraud and false accounting charges against former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi because the statute of limitations has expired. Berlusconi and co-defendant David Mills will no longer have to face tax fraud and accounting charges related to events before the end of 1998 and …

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