Bush signs legislation to protect phone records, ban pretexting

[JURIST] President Bush Friday signed into law [press release] new federal legislation seeking to protect traditional, wireless, and internet phone calling consumers by preventing phone companies from selling their private phone records without customer authorization and criminalizing attempts to obtain those fraudulently. The Telephone Records and Privacy Protection Act of 2006 [PDF text] passed [JURIST report] the Senate in December in response to the Hewlett-Packard corporate spying scandal [JURIST news archive] that broke this past summer.

The Act prohibits "making false or fraudulent statements" to phone company employees in an effort to obtain confidential phone records. It also forbids "accessing customer accounts through the Internet" without authorization. Those who contravene the Act can face up to 10 years in prison. AP has more.



 

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