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Legal news from Friday, November 3, 2006
by Gabriel Haboubi

The US Army said Friday that commanders on the ground have prevented Army Sgt. Santos A. Cardona, found guilty in June of abusing detainees at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison, from being redeployed to Iraq out of fear for his safety. Cardona was convicted of two counts of …

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by Gabriel Haboubi

British-based bank Barclays PLC announced Friday that it has reached an agreement with Enron to settle litigation in the US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York relating to Enron’s bankruptcy estate. Barclays has agreed to pay Enron $144 million in the settlement, …

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by Michael Sung

Canadian Justice Minister Vic Toews said Friday that the Canadian government will not appeal an October 19 Ontario Superior Court decision that threw out secrecy-related provisions of the Security of Information Act as unconstitutional. The Canadian Department of Justice announced that the government will instead consider future legislative options [press …

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by Michael Sung

The War Crimes Chamber of the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina Friday convicted former Bosnian Serb military commander Marko Samardzija of crimes against humanity for ordering the massacre of at least 144 Muslisms from the Kljuc region in 1992 during the 1992-1995 ethnic war between Serbs, Bosnian Muslims, and Croats. The …

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by James M Yoch Jr

Iraq's defense minister Friday canceled leave for Iraqi soldiers and summoned all military personnel currently on leave to return to station in preparation for potential violence after the anticipated announcement of a verdict in the first Saddam Hussein trial on Sunday. The order was given in a video of a meeting between top Iraqi military and …

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by James M Yoch Jr

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) has warned federal prosecutors about leaking information on ongoing investigations of legislators to the media in advance of the upcoming mid-term elections. In recent months, several news outlets have identified federal officials as sources for reports about probes into allegedly improper actions by prominent lawmakers, including former Florida representative Mark Foley …

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by Lisl Brunner

The new government of Thailand has dropped charges against 92 Muslim participants in a 2004 anti-government protest. The news comes a day after interim Prime Minister Chulanont Surayud apologized to Muslim leaders in the southern Pattani province for the former government's crackdown on an Islamic insurgency. Surayud, who came to power after …

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by James M Yoch Jr

Medicaid assistance will be available to infants under the age of one year born in the US to illegal immigrants only if they have citizenship documentation, according to Bush administration officials quoted in the New York Times Friday. The new policy requires illegal immigrant parents to file an application with Medicaid and provide citizenship …

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by Lisl Brunner

The first lady of Taiwan has been indicted on charges of embezzling $448,000 in state funds and falsifying documents. The state prosecutor's office says there is enough evidence of wrongdoing to also indict her husband President Chen Shui-bian, but Article 52 of the constitution specifically grants Chen immunity from criminal prosecution …

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by Lisl Brunner

The government of Senegal indicated Thursday that it will reexamine its local laws in order to bring to justice former Chad dictator Hissene Habre, now living in Senegal. In 1992 a Chadian Truth Commission report accused Habre of committing some 40,000 acts of murder and torture of political opponents during his rule from 1982 …

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by Kate Heneroty

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) delayed a vote on the proposed $82.2 billion merger of BellSouth and AT&T for the third time Thursday. The measure was previously delayed to allow Democrats on the commission more time to study the proposal. An FCC official told Reuters that the group had made little progress in …

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by Kate Heneroty

US President George W. Bush urged voters at campaign rallies in Montana and Nevada Thursday to vote Republican so that the Senate can continue to confirm key judicial nominees "who will not legislate from the bench." Bush pointed to Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito [OYEZ profile; JURIST news …

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by Kate Heneroty

The investigation into abuses committed during Argentina's Dirty War has been expanded to include the tenure of former President Isabel Peron, a government minister said Thursday. Peron, the wife of late President Juan Peron, took office in 1974 but was ousted in a 1976 coup. During her tenure, leftist guerrillas …

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