Germany worried about fortunes of EU constitution in French presidential race

[JURIST] German officials have expressed some concern about the future of the proposed European Constitution [text; JURIST news archive] in light of positions taken by two leading rivals for the French presidency. Newly-chosen French Socialist Party candidate Segolene Royal [BBC profile; advocacy website in French], and conservative aspirant Nicolas Sarkozy [BBC profile; party website, in French; JURIST news archive] have both shown reservations about approving the charter after French voters rejected it [JURIST report] last May. Royal, an initial supporter of the pact, backtracked on it during the past year and Sarkozy has advocated a weaker version of the treaty.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel [official website, in German; BBC profile] wants to move forward with the treaty when Germany takes over the six-month rotating EU presidency [official materials] in January 2007. Angelica Schwall-Dueren [official website, in German], an EU expert for Germany’s Social Democratic Party (SPD) [party website in German] in parliament, told Reuters that it is hoped the French candidates don’t become too attached to positions that make the treaty impossible to ratify. Since Germany wishes to establish a new proposal and timeline for the constitutional treaty at the two-day European Union summit in Brussels that starts on June 21, only a few days after the French election ends, Germany’s foreign ministry will discuss the treaty with advisors of both French candidates much earlier. Reuters has more.



 

About Paper Chase

Paper Chase is JURIST's real-time legal news service, powered by a team of 30 law student reporters and editors led by law professor Bernard Hibbitts at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. As an educational service, Paper Chase is dedicated to presenting important legal news and materials rapidly, objectively and intelligibly in an accessible format.

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.