A Collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh
advertisement
Legal news from Friday, October 13, 2006
by Stefanie Presley

The Maryland Court of Appeals unanimously upheld a preliminary injunction this week barring the state from discontinuing Medicaid benefits to approximately 3,000 legal immigrant recipients, all of whom migrated to Maryland within the past five years. The ruling means that Medicaid benefits to those beneficiaries will be maintained while judges …

[read more]
by Michael Sung

The United Nations General Assembly appointed South Korean Foreign Minister Ban Ki-moon as the next UN secretary-general on Friday. Ban, a career diplomat, is set to succeed Kofi Annan when the two-term secretary-general steps down on December 31, 2006. Ban was nominated by the UN Security Council …

[read more]
by Ned Mulcahy

Pakistani Interior Minister Aftab Sherpao said Friday that the US plans to release two Pakistani detainees held at Guantanamo Bay and that Pakistan expects the men to arrive in their home country by October 15. Sherpao also said that six other detainees being held by the US at Bagram Airbase [GlobalSecurity.org backgrounder] in Afghanistan will …

[read more]
by Joe Shaulis

The ruling party of Rwanda announced Friday that it had directed its lawmakers to support a forthcoming bill to abolish the death penalty. Leaders of the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) voted to take the action last weekend at a meeting chaired by Rwandan President Paul Kagame, a …

[read more]
by Ned Mulcahy

The Supreme Court of Canada unanimously ruled Friday that a British Columbia judge overstepped his sentencing power when he ordered a convicted criminal on probation for sexual assault to submit to mandatory submissions of bodily fluids for examination. The court held that such orders were contrary to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. In its …

[read more]
by Alexandria Samuel

A proposed $78 billion merger between telecom giants BellSouth and AT&T stalled unexpectedly Friday in the Federal Communications Commission after two FCC commissioners, both Democrats, asked Chairman Kevin Martin for more time to study it. The deal had already been approved without reservation by the US Department of Justice Antitrust Division [official …

[read more]
by Michael Sung

Mohamed Shorbagi, the Palestinian imam of a mosque in Rome, Georgia, has pleaded guilty to a charge of providing material support to a foreign terrorist organization (FTO) [US State Dept. materials], according to a criminal information and plea agreement unsealed Friday by the US Attorney's Office for the Northern District of Georgia. Shorbagi …

[read more]
by Joe Shaulis

Freelance Croatian journalist Domagoj Margetic, charged with publishing the names of two protected witnesses online, pleaded not guilty to contempt of court Friday at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). Margetic is accused of publishing the names of witnesses who testified in the trial of Tihomir Blaskic …

[read more]
by Joe Shaulis

President Bush on Friday signed a bill designed to strengthen US port security by authorizing $3.4 billion to install radiation detectors, increase random searches of cargo and experiment with checking cargo before it reaches the United States. Speaking at the White House signing ceremony, Bush said the Safe Accountability for Every Port Act of …

[read more]
by James M Yoch Jr

The US Department of Defense Inspector General on Friday announced that the armed force's Southern Command has been ordered to investigate allegations that detainee abuse is occurring at the military facility at Guantanamo Bay. Last week, USMC Lt. Col. Colby Vokey, who represents Canadian Guantanamo detainee Omar Khadr [JURIST news …

[read more]
by James M Yoch Jr

US Rep. Bob Ney (R-OH) on Friday pleaded guilty to charges of conspiracy and making false statements in connection with his involvement with lobbyist Jack Abramoff. Ney accepted money and gifts in exchange for taking actions on behalf of Abramoff and his clients, sixteen of which were admitted by …

[read more]
by David Shucosky

US President Bush on Friday signed the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006, a bill attached to a larger port security measure late last month by Congress, making it illegal for banks or credit card companies to process transactions involving Internet gambling. Internet gambling is an estimated $12 billion dollar a …

[read more]
by James M Yoch Jr

US Army Sergeant Ricky Clousing, a paratrooper and interpreter who disputed the legality of the war in Iraq, has pleaded guilty to going absent without leave for 14 months. A court-martial in Fort Bragg, NC, on Thursday sentenced Clousing to 11 months' confinement, with all but three months suspended, …

[read more]
by Lisl Brunner

A bill allowing a referendum on whether to oust Taiwanese President Chen Shui-bian was defeated in the Taiwanese legislature Friday. Sponsored by the People First Party (PFP), the bill accused the president of corruption. Chen is currently under investigation for his use of a confidential state affairs budget, and his …

[read more]
by Lisl Brunner

A UK coroner's inquest ruled Friday that US troops were responsible for the "unlawful" killing of British reporter Terry Lloyd in Iraq in March 2003. Oxford Deputy Coroner Andrew Walker concluded that Lloyd, an award-winning reporter for ITN, was killed by a shot to the head as a minivan carried him to a hospital for …

[read more]
by Lisl Brunner

A court in Japan has dismissed an appeal by 81 plaintiffs who argued that the visits of former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to a war shrine honoring Japanese dead as well as war criminals from World War II violated the constitutional separation of state and religion. The Fukuoka High Court in Okinawa found it …

[read more]
by Kate Heneroty

Members of Britain's House of Lords Thursday voiced their support for an amendment to the Armed Forces Bill that would pardon 306 World War I soldiers who were executed for various offenses including cowardice, sleeping while on duty, striking a superior officer, disobedience and desertion. The bill, with the pardons amendment, passed …

[read more]
by Kate Heneroty

The Santiago Court of Appeals voted 16-2 Thursday to strip the immunity of former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, in a case involving the kidnapping and murder of a chemist who worked for the secret police. Eugenio Berrios was kidnapped and taken to Uruguay to prevent him from being questioned in the …

[read more]
by Kate Heneroty

The US State Department has rejected Britain's latest call for the closure of the Guantanamo Bay detention center, saying the prison would remain open as long as necessary and was needed to house "some very dangerous people." UK Foreign Minister Margaret Beckett on Thursday called for Guantanamo's closure because of its record …

[read more]
by Kate Heneroty

The US Department of Defense (DOD) labeled anti-war activities as "potential terrorist activity" and monitored students, Quakers and other anti-war groups while collecting information for a domestic terror threats database, according to documents released Thursday by the American Civil Liberties Union. The documents, obtained from the DOD under a Freedom of …

[read more]

Latest Readers

@JURISTnews

Support JURIST

We rely on our readers to keep JURIST running

 Donate now!

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.