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Legal news from Friday, September 8, 2006
by Alexis Unkovic

Conrad Black, the Canadian-born former chairman of media company Hollinger International, pleaded not guilty in Chicago Friday to the latest tax evasion charges he faces stemming from his initial November 2005 indictment related to the $2.1 billion sale of several hundred Canadian newspapers and alleged abuse of corporate …

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by Alexis Unkovic

Former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet can now face human rights charges stemming from the torture of thousands of citizens at Villa Grimaldi prison, an infamous political detention center run by Pinochet’s secret police between 1974 and 1977, thanks to a ruling issued Friday by the Supreme Court of Chile [official website, in …

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by Alexis Unkovic

The US military discovered several "torture chambers" northeast of Baghdad in May and June, Maj. Gen. Thomas R. Turner II, the senior commander of US and Iraqi forces in northern Iraq, said Friday. Turner told Pentagon reporters via teleconference about the discovery of the "torture chambers," which consisted of two or three small rooms and allegedly …

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by Alexis Unkovic

The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) said Thursday that its Division of Corporation Finance will begin drafting an amendment to an SEC Rule under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 which says a company can deny its shareholders the right to vote on a proposal that "relates …

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by D. Wes Rist

Leading Wednesday's international brief, Amnesty International has alleged that efforts by Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe to provide housing for the hundreds of thousands of residents he forcefully evicted in 2005 have fallen well short of international human rights standards. Amnesty's report presents evidence of a complete failure to protect Zimbabweans made homeless by the Zimbabwean government …

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by Joe Shaulis

President Bush's announcement that 14 terrorism suspects have been transferred from secret CIA prisons to Guantanamo Bay is "significant" but not sufficient, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Louise Arbour said through a spokesman Friday. Instead, Arbour renewed a demand that the prisons be "completely abolished." Last year, UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan defended Arbour …

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by Lisl Brunner

European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso has called on all European Union (EU) member states to collaborate in stemming the tide of illegal immigrants. On Thursday, Barroso wrote a letter to the heads of the 25 countries of the EU, stating that "the massive arrival of illegal immigrants to the European Union, mainly …

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by Joe Shaulis

The Military Commissions Act of 2006 would allow CIA agents and others to use interrogation techniques not condoned by the US Department of Defense and would restrict federal courts' ability to enforce prisoner rights guaranteed by the Geneva Conventions, according to legal experts quoted in Friday's New York Times. …

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by Lisl Brunner

A federal judge in Oregon has allowed a lawsuit by the US branch of the Saudi Arabia-based Al-Haramain Islamic Foundation to proceed against the US government over the warrantless wiretapping of communications between the foundation and its attorneys. On Thursday, Judge Garr King of US District Court in Portland denied the government's motion to …

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by Joshua Pantesco

Mexican President-elect Felipe Calderon, who was certified as the winner of Mexico's disputed presidential election earlier this week, said Thursday that he will advocate for US immigration reform to allow Mexicans currently in America without papers to work in the US legally. The US Congress reconvened this week, …

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by Joshua Pantesco

A federal judge issued a preliminary ruling and injunction on Thursday to prevent the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) from selling oil and gas leases to land near Teshekpuk Lake in Alaska to oil companies. US District Court Judge James Singleton ruled that if the rights to drill for oil on the land …

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by Joshua Pantesco

President Bush's recent acknowledgement of secret CIA prisons for important terror detainees was motivated by the personal urgings of UK Prime Minister Tony Blair to release all British prisoners, and from pleas to close the sites from other US allies, along with US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, who suggested to Bush that the secret prison regime …

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by Joshua Pantesco

Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage personally admitted to leaking the identity of CIA agent Valerie Plame Wilson during a phone interview on Thursday. Armitage apologized for the leak, which he maintains was unintentional. Armitage said the admission came during interviews with reporters Bob Woodward and Robert Nowak, when asked why Mr. Wilson, an ambassador, was …

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