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Legal news from Monday, July 3, 2006
by Joe Shaulis

The Federation of Arab Journalists (FAJ) on Monday issued a statement declaring its opposition to a draft publications law in Egypt, which the group said politicians could use to stifle journalists with the threat of jail. The FAJ asserted that Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak promised two years ago …

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by Joe Shaulis

British Home Secretary John Reid asked the Court of Appeal on Monday to overturn a ruling that terrorism suspects cannot be detained without charge under so-called control orders, arguing that a judgment last week by a High Court judge contained "misunderstandings and errors." Mr. Justice Sullivan ruled that the orders authorizing …

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by Jaime Jansen

Mexico's Federal Electoral Institute is set for Wednesday's start of the official legal count of ballots cast in Sunday's disputed presidential election [BBC Q/A] after preliminary results led to the two main candidates each declaring themselves the winner. Conservative candidate Felipe Calderon, of the National Action …

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by Joe Shaulis

The US Supreme Court on Monday stayed a lower court's order that a 29-foot cross honoring Korean War veterans be removed from city-owned property in San Diego. Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who oversees appeals from the Ninth Circuit, granted without comment the temporary delay requested by the San Diegans for the Mt. …

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by Kiran Chapagain

Nepal's Maoist communist party announced Monday it is suspending its "People's Courts" that have been running in urban areas of Nepal, including the capital Kathmandu. Maoist supreme commander Prachanda announced the suspension in a statement amidst national and international criticism of the panels that have run parallel to the government's regular courts, are not recognized by the …

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by Jaime Jansen

Iraqi Shiite leader Abdel Aziz al-Hakim, head of the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq, said Monday that he would like the amnesty provision of the proposed national reconciliation plan to also cover insurgents who may have killed US servicemen. Al-Hakim's comments contrast sharply with those made …

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by Jaime Jansen

A Chinese Cabinet official said Monday that a draft law imposing fines on media organizations for covering sudden emergencies without approval from the local government would also apply to international news organizations. It is not clear, however, whether he was expressing his own views or those of the government. The official, Wang Yongqing, the vice minister of …

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by Joe Shaulis

A US military lawyer for David Hicks said the US government cannot legally prosecute the Australian-born Guantanamo detainee again because a trial would constitute double jeopardy under the Fifth Amendment to the US Constitution. The lawyer, Maj. Michael Mori, told the Sydney Morning Herald on Monday that a trial for Hicks had begun in 2004, …

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by Joe Shaulis

Former Chadian president Hissene Habre will face trial in Senegal on charges that he committed torture, mass killings, and other abuses in the 1980s, leaders of the African Union decided at an assembly in Gambia this past weekend. Senegal's president, Abdoulaye Wade, said his …

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by Jaime Jansen

Federal prosecutors in Charlotte charged former US Army soldier Steven Green with murder and rape Monday in connection with the death of an Iraqi woman and three family members in Mahmudiya in March. US Army Maj. Gen. James Thurman, commander of the 4th Infantry Division, ordered a criminal investigation into the four deaths after two soldiers were …

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by Joe Shaulis

Bolivian President Evo Morales may be forced to compromise with a special assembly that will rewrite the country's constitution after Morales' Movement Toward Socialism Party (MAS) apparently failed to gain a full two-thirds majority in an election held Sunday. A television network's survey of actual votes from …

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by Jaime Jansen

Rear Admiral Harry Harris, commander of the US detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, said in remarks published Sunday that as many as 75 percent of Guantanamo inmates no longer provide the US with useful intelligence. Speaking to TIME magazine before the US Supreme Court ordered the Bush administration to halt military tribunals for detainees …

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by Jaime Jansen

Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Shimon Peres said Sunday that some two dozen members of the Palestinian cabinet and legislature from the governing Hamas faction detained by Israeli forces in West Bank raids last week will be prosecuted and put on trial for "participating, supporting terroristic acts against the civilian government." The arrests were made Thursday …

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by Andrew Wood

Seventeen Cambodian judges and 10 others from Australia, Austria, Canada, France, Japan, Poland, Sri Lanka, the Netherlands, and the US who will serve on the Khmer Rouge genocide tribunal were sworn in Monday in a symbolic ceremony at Phnom Penh's Silver Pagoda in the royal palace. The tribunal, which will prosecute former leaders of …

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by Jaime Jansen

Six Frenchmen who were released from the US detention center in Guantanamo Bay went on trial Monday in Paris, where they stand accused of attending combat training at an al Qaeda camp in Afghanistan. France freed five of the suspects after their repatriation to France from Guantanamo in July 2004 and March 2005. The …

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by Jaime Jansen

The UK parliament's Home Affairs Committee has warned that the 28-day limit for police to detain terror suspects without charge, mandated under the Terrorism Act 2006, may need to be extended. In a report released Monday, the committee also said, however, that in order to increase the 28-day detention limit MPs …

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by Jaime Jansen

US Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and several Republican US senators expressed optimism over the weekend that the administration and Congress will be able to strike an agreement on legislation to establish military commissions to try Guantanamo Bay detainees in the wake of Thursday's last week's US Supreme Court ruling in Hamdan v. …

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